Newbie Question(s) so dumb, you're afraid to even ask!

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Cool! Any good examples what you mean by large and boring niche?
Data type stuff - finding badly formated data that people search for with long-tail keywords.

For example, I've looked at finance-type data stuff. There is so much data generated each day from the markets there are many businesses that specialized in just saving and storing it and offering it for resell. Well, that might have used to be the only viable model. But with how cheap server space is much of that data you can probably build sites around having it and ranking for people looking for it and just giving it away for free mostly with display ads.

Also, it will help with main higher volume keywords. If you make a site that specializes in having option history data for S&P 500 stocks (such as what did an Amazon 7/16 call option for $3000 sell for throughout the day over the last 6 months or something) you can probably also rank easier for "how to trade options" or something.
 

DanielS

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What's the best way to go about deleting posts marked as "Discovered Not Indexed" in GSC that won't index even after force-indexing them multiple times? Should they just be deleted or is there something that needs to be done in GSC to signal to Google that the posts have been deleted? I'm not talking about 404-ing or anything like that- these posts have 0 links and haven't gotten a single visitor in the past 6+ months.
 

Ryuzaki

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What's the best way to go about deleting posts marked as "Discovered Not Indexed" in GSC that won't index even after force-indexing them multiple times? Should they just be deleted or is there something that needs to be done in GSC to signal to Google that the posts have been deleted? I'm not talking about 404-ing or anything like that- these posts have 0 links and haven't gotten a single visitor in the past 6+ months.

I wouldn't do this. If you wrote them to your standards, they're good posts and you just need page rank to them to justify them indexing. They're likely optimized for keywords that are worth going after since you already wrote them too. If they suck I'd just improve them a bit.

But 404-ing is the correct way to do this. The "urgent" way is to make them show a 410 error, where 404 is "missing but might come back" and 410 is "gone on purpose".

Back to my original point, nearly everyone with indexing problems don't have indexing problems. They have page rank problems. The solution is to get more of it.
 

NSG

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Let's say I'm trying to rank for:
  • "dark chocolate gummy bears" (search volume 10-100) vs
  • "dark chocolate covered gummy bears" (search volume 100-1K).
What is the impact (from Google's perspective) of writing a title like "Best mouth watering dark chocolate gummy bears"? Are they going to ignore the supporting words and rank for the direct phase? Or are you better off targeting just the phrase directly in your title?

Is it possible if you used the higher search volume key phrase in your title, and included the lower volume key phrase in a subheading within the article to get ranked for the smaller volume phrase?

Later I decide I wanted to rank for more terms in the gummy bear family:
"dark chocolate gummy bears"
"milk chocolate gummy bears"
"white chocolate gummy bears"

Would it be better to write 3 separate articles targeting those or just add on to the original article? And if it is better to just make one larger article, is the sandbox going to start over because I updated the page?
 

Ryuzaki

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Let's say I'm trying to rank for:
  • "dark chocolate gummy bears" (search volume 10-100) vs
  • "dark chocolate covered gummy bears" (search volume 100-1K).
What is the impact (from Google's perspective) of writing a title like "Best mouth watering dark chocolate gummy bears"? Are they going to ignore the supporting words and rank for the direct phase? Or are you better off targeting just the phrase directly in your title?

The word "covered" changes the intent of the search by narrowing down the product specifications, so I'd consider these different things (assuming chocolate flavored gummy bears exist as opposed to normal ones coated in chocolate).

Google won't ignore the supporting words but it won't hurt your ability to rank for the main phrase, considering you'll be doing a lot more on-page SEO that tells them what you intend to rank for. I'd rephrase that title for the users and for Google though, like "The Best Dark Chocolate Gummy Bears Your Mouth is Already Begging For" or whatever. It pushes the main keyword closer to the front (will probably improve your click through rating for users and signifies importance for Google). Users need to see the main key phrase ASAP or you risk losing them.

Is it possible if you used the higher search volume key phrase in your title, and included the lower volume key phrase in a subheading within the article to get ranked for the smaller volume phrase?

Absolutely, but they need to be tightly related keywords, with one acting as the parent and the other acting as a related child. It doesn't have to be this way but you'll find a much greater success rate if you do it this way.

Would it be better to write 3 separate articles targeting those or just add on to the original article? And if it is better to just make one larger article, is the sandbox going to start over because I updated the page?

Separate articles based on the intent. Dark is not Milk is not White. The sandbox doesn't start over by updating the page. You tend to see a boost because you restart your freshness score to 100% and then it slowly decays again.
 
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illmasterj

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Say I wanted to generate a site using data - like government data or very reliable data - with the intention of turning that into pages with unique insights, ranking those pages, earning traffic and then monetizing it somehow..... where would I find said data?

Are there some obvious search strings to find these types of things?

...I'm so green to this stuff I don't even know how to ask the damn question!
 
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Does anyone have any experience with DomainAgents? I registered a domain last year and was surprised it was available, a pretty solid name IMO. Someone offered $200 and then $500 but it's hard to negotiate when DomainAgents is the middle man.

Was going to develop it but someone has a solid youtube with the name but they use a "z" instead of an "s" and a "y" instead of an "i". And someone else has the www official "domain" .com so it would be difficult to get a solid social media handle.
 

bernard

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Say I wanted to generate a site using data - like government data or very reliable data - with the intention of turning that into pages with unique insights, ranking those pages, earning traffic and then monetizing it somehow..... where would I find said data?

Are there some obvious search strings to find these types of things?

...I'm so green to this stuff I don't even know how to ask the damn question!

Here is something:

https://www.programmableweb.com/apis

It's a list of free, open APIs from all kinds of sources.

Depending on where you live, you should try calling the local Departments of your government and ask them if they have some sort of data sharing, open knowledge, initiative. They usually have. If you're lucky, then they have common standards and publish data already.
 

Taq

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Does anyone have any experience with DomainAgents? I registered a domain last year and was surprised it was available, a pretty solid name IMO. Someone offered $200 and then $500 but it's hard to negotiate when DomainAgents is the middle man.

Was going to develop it but someone has a solid youtube with the name but they use a "z" instead of an "s" and a "y" instead of an "i". And someone else has the www official "domain" .com so it would be difficult to get a solid social media handle.
I'm using them to try and buy a domain, but so far, they've not got a response from the owner; maybe it's you?
 

Sutra

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This is a retarded question, hah:

When Ahrefs shows $0 cpc for a keyword, in general how close is that to reality? Obviously, it will cost something for an advertiser to bid on the keyword. But is there actually a good possibility it will only be 1 cent, 3 cents, 5 cents, etc?
 

Ryuzaki

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When Ahrefs shows $0 cpc for a keyword, in general how close is that to reality? Obviously, it will cost something for an advertiser to bid on the keyword. But is there actually a good possibility it will only be 1 cent, 3 cents, 5 cents, etc?

Disregarding whether or not the Ahrefs information is accurate, there's generally advertisers that will bid on anything at the minimum floor, meaning they're willing to pay a penny and be the "100% fill rate" type of advertiser. Basically, if nobody else is willing to pay for it, they'll swoop in at the very minimum and take the impression. Of course there may be a handful of these people pushing it up to 2¢ or 3¢ even. It's very realistic that this happens, and if Ahrefs has an accurate data source in this regard, then yes. It even happens on high CPC keywords when advertiser budgets run up for the day, etc.
 

Sutra

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Disregarding whether or not the Ahrefs information is accurate, there's generally advertisers that will bid on anything at the minimum floor, meaning they're willing to pay a penny and be the "100% fill rate" type of advertiser. Basically, if nobody else is willing to pay for it, they'll swoop in at the very minimum and take the impression. Of course there may be a handful of these people pushing it up to 2¢ or 3¢ even. It's very realistic that this happens, and if Ahrefs has an accurate data source in this regard, then yes. It even happens on high CPC keywords when advertiser budgets run up for the day, etc.
Well, that is fantastic news. Looks like I’ll have a whole new traffic source to exploit.
 

Ryuzaki

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Well, that is fantastic news. Looks like I’ll have a whole new traffic source to exploit.

I'd just keep in mind that we're talking about CPC and not CPM. If they bid a 1¢ CPC you still have to generate the click to get that penny. But if you're talking about one of the major CPM networks, you're going to make a fraction of a penny per impression but your overall CPM will end up being much higher than what the CPC-based CPMs would have given you. This is because a lot of advertisers bid on your site and topic and not on your keywords in these impression-based networks.
 

CCarter

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pay a penny and be the "100% fill rate" type of advertiser.
This is exactly the strategy "We Buy Ugly Houses" (https://www.webuyuglyhouses.com/) and InventHelp (https://inventhelp.com/) - Caveman Inventor helping service, did with late night un-sold commercial slots on TV. I believe it was these two - going off of memory.

They went to the Networks and said "we'll buy all your unsold commercial slots." Obviously the networks said "we don't have any unsold slots." LOL They did. After some back and forth negotiations they got the unsold slots and if you remember when late at nights you always saw that caveman for inventors commercial starting around 11:00 pm, and always throughout the night, for years.

This happened until others caught on, but then the internet came and pretty much through a wrench in TV's dominance in reaching audiences since now you could target users directly and even extremely smaller players could get in. A small company called Amazon started using CPC arbitration to scope up users from Google and the rest is history.

FYI - the lowest cost per bid is $.05 I believe, at least with Adwords a while back.
 

Golan

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Does anyone have any experience with DomainAgents? I registered a domain last year and was surprised it was available, a pretty solid name IMO. Someone offered $200 and then $500 but it's hard to negotiate when DomainAgents is the middle man.
I sold two domains via them. They are good in negotiations and closing deals; if the offer doesnt increase this might merely mean the buyer doesnt want the domain for higher price.
 

Sutra

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I'd just keep in mind that we're talking about CPC and not CPM. If they bid a 1¢ CPC you still have to generate the click to get that penny. But if you're talking about one of the major CPM networks, you're going to make a fraction of a penny per impression but your overall CPM will end up being much higher than what the CPC-based CPMs would have given you. This is because a lot of advertisers bid on your site and topic and not on your keywords in these impression-based networks.
In this case I’m actually considering being the advertiser. There are tons of keywords with $0 cpc. I still need to look into it further but my initial thought is if I can find a way to create ads in bulk quickly for these types of keywords, I can flood the market with advertising to force myself into the brains of millions of people.
 
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Hi all, I've discovered this site a couple of days ago and have done a LOT of reading here already! I'm not from a Digital Marketing background so a lot of the content and concepts are completely new to me and weirdly I'm enjoying the feeling of being a complete newbie at something and knowing I have a lot to learn.

One of my early ideas is to start an informational website and build its traffic with the plan of eventually introducing ads and also funnelling the traffic towards an additional brokerage service I will offer down the line. I've got a free trial of SEMRUSH and the obvious keywords for the "niche" only have a monthly search volume of around 4,000.

Have I gone too narrow with this? My initial thought is potential for ad revenue is probably very limited with this level of search volume, but I still think the future brokerage can bring in decent income.

Does anyone have experience of ranking a site with low search volumes? And what kind of search volumes should I be targetting generally in any industry/niche to be profitable?
 

Ryuzaki

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I've got a free trial of SEMRUSH and the obvious keywords for the "niche" only have a monthly search volume of around 4,000.

Have I gone too narrow with this? My initial thought is potential for ad revenue is probably very limited with this level of search volume, but I still think the future brokerage can bring in decent income.

Depends on how many of these keywords there are, how hot the traffic is from the intent of the keywords, and the value of the brokerage service. 4,000 isn't bad, when you consider you'll pick up a lot of long-tail keywords for each article, too (if you can rank them).

As far as ads go, if you want to offer a service, you'll probably not want to get as aggressive with the ads as you need to be to make it worth your while. I'd decide if the brokerage service is worth pursuing, and then making that the primary goal and forget about the ads, unless you also create some informational part of the site away from the main "funnel pages" that you can slam with ads. But even those should serve to lead people in need to your funnel pages.

The best advice I was ever given was to start at the point of conversion and work backwards. That sounds like your service, and nowhere in expanding outwards up your sales funnel do I see a point is sending your visitors to some other brokerage for pennies while they make thousands per conversion or whatever.

But yes, I make a lot of money on keywords with a lot less volume across a lot of posts. It's viable with ads.