Newbie Question(s) so dumb, you're afraid to even ask!

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Can anyone tell me, is it possible to transfer the ownership of a specific Amazon tracking ID to another person?

Or delete a tracking ID from my account, so a buyer of a given site can simply create the same tracking ID on their account? Without the need to change tracking IDs on the site?

I ask because I'm in the process of selling a site and the buyer seems to expect me to hand over my amazon account, but this isn't an option because I have other sites using amazon etc, also it's tied to my personal info (tax, bank, etc).

Just to check, it is the norm for the buyer to have the responsibility of changing the tracking IDs to their own account eh? Trying to make the transaction go smoothly so I've offered to change the tracking IDs myself (unfortunately I used amzn short links for some posts) would appreciate any advice
 
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Can anyone tell me, is it possible to transfer the ownership of a specific Amazon tracking ID to another person?

Or delete a tracking ID from my account, so a buyer of a given site can simply create the same tracking ID on their account? Without the need to change tracking IDs on the site?

I ask because I'm in the process of selling a site and the buyer seems to expect me to hand over my amazon account, but this isn't an option because I have other sites using amazon etc, also it's tied to my personal info (tax, bank, etc).

Just to check, it is the norm for the buyer to have the responsibility of changing the tracking IDs to their own account eh? Trying to make the transaction go smoothly so I've offered to change the tracking IDs myself (unfortunately I used amzn short links for some posts) would appreciate any advice

Not possible to transfer tag to another account. Never hand over your Amazon account. They need to create their own account and tracking IDs. Usually it's the buyer's responsibility to change the tracking IDs. However, I've always done it for the buyers of my websites since it's a simple database search and replace when you don't use short urls.
 
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After receiving a backlink, how long does it usually take to start passing on link juice? Also, how long does it usually take to show up in Ahrefs? I obtained multiple backlinks from a page but Ahref's shows no connection to my site.
 

secretagentdad

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After receiving a backlink, how long does it usually take to start passing on link juice? Also, how long does it usually take to show up in Ahrefs? I obtained multiple backlinks from a page but Ahref's shows no connection to my site.
Nobody outside google really knows.

My best guess is you get some value when its first indexed.
You also get some value when comparison tests data gets merged in over time on later dates.

If you want to try and correlate new links you've obtained with keyword improvements use a tracker like Serp Woo or merge in your search console data with calendar notations for new links in excel or something similar.

Ahrefs is a third party tracker that finds your new links on its own over time.
It has no association with what Google does.
 

bernard

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After receiving a backlink, how long does it usually take to start passing on link juice? Also, how long does it usually take to show up in Ahrefs? I obtained multiple backlinks from a page but Ahref's shows no connection to my site.

Don't use Ahrefs for that, it doesn't matter.

Use "site:url" search in google to see if the page with your link is indexed. That's all that matters. You can check in Google Search Console afterwards, but it can take months.

I really don't bother with trying to deduce when a link kicks in. Too many variables to connect it to more or less traffic. I go by best practice and just steadily try to improve my backlink count.
 

bernard

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Does Ezoic, Mediavine etc, mess up the design of a site as much as Adsense?

I might have asked this before, but I added Adsense to some pages and it's very aggressive. Definitely not what I would ever have done, even in 2011.
 
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Anyone seen (or read a good case study highlighting) a clear correlation between a big YouTube push and rankings growth? My thinking is thousands more nofollows from a trusted platform, many of which are clicked on by actual users, surely must be decently strong authority and relevancy signals?

Trying to convince my Neolithic corporate overlords to double down on video development but despite the brand being in clear decline (a'la Trends data) branding alone is not enough of a justification apparently, nor are conversions because they see rates next to organic search/paid search and scoff..
 

Ryuzaki

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Does Ezoic, Mediavine etc, mess up the design of a site as much as Adsense?

Stuff like Adsense Auto Ads and Ezoic try to split test positions on pages. It can be random and crazy, like even in footers and headers. Adsense is even removing padding or margins so they can place larger ads.

Mediavine and the like also auto load ads but they do it in the main content at regular intervals that you can decide. I would say that these do not affect your design, where as the ones above do.

My thinking is thousands more nofollows from a trusted platform, many of which are clicked on by actual users, surely must be decently strong authority and relevancy signals?

I would tend to agree, especially after Google launched the newer a rel="" options like sponsored, ug, and whatever the other one is. They obviously want to take nofollow into account in some fashion and need us to train their algorithms about which they should count or not.

The Income School guys always go hard on Youtube for their sites. Whether or not it works out well for them organically, I don't know, but they manage to push respectable traffic through. You might dig around their posts and see what you can find.
 
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I’ve been reaching out to websites in my niche regarding guest posting for a couple of weeks now and most of the time the websites want money to include a link in the article or our bio on the page. Is this normal? I don’t necessarily have an issue with paying $30 or $50 to acquire a backlink from a DA 20+ website (from a monetary view) but I’m worried about the long-lasting effects.

This may be a really basic and dumb question (because I think the answer is already “yes”) – but is this considered buying backlinks? And is this always a bad thing? The content being provided is quality and the websites being pitched aren’t spam; but so far pretty much every website that has responded wants to be paid to include a guest post on their website. Is funding guest posts in this way still considered whitehat SEO?

Previously, I only considered PBNs and services that provided you with “X backlinks of DA XX” to be buying backlinks but I’m ready to stand corrected.
 

Ryuzaki

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but is this considered buying backlinks?

Yes.

And is this always a bad thing?

No.

Just don't accept an author biography or anything that says "this is a guest post by blah blah" because all of that is supposed to be nofollow and if it isn't Google may apply it, and there's been manual actions because sites collected a lot of guest posts that announced they were guest posts but didn't use nofollow.

If you give them a guest post, and this is some low tier site and you just want the link instead of the branding, then take just the link (rather than credit for being the author). Google won't know the difference in these cases, as long as you're sensible about your anchor texts.
 

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Is this normal?

Well, on the flip, why would anyone take time out of their day to do anything for free? Especially knowing it will genuinely help you make more money. Out of the kindness of their hearts?
 

bernard

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I’ve been reaching out to websites in my niche regarding guest posting for a couple of weeks now and most of the time the websites want money to include a link in the article or our bio on the page. Is this normal? I don’t necessarily have an issue with paying $30 or $50 to acquire a backlink from a DA 20+ website (from a monetary view) but I’m worried about the long-lasting effects.

This may be a really basic and dumb question (because I think the answer is already “yes”) – but is this considered buying backlinks? And is this always a bad thing? The content being provided is quality and the websites being pitched aren’t spam; but so far pretty much every website that has responded wants to be paid to include a guest post on their website. Is funding guest posts in this way still considered whitehat SEO?

Previously, I only considered PBNs and services that provided you with “X backlinks of DA XX” to be buying backlinks but I’m ready to stand corrected.

Authority Hackers have talked about this in some detail now, because it apparantly is so common.

They say to consider it an "editorial fee" and I agree. As long as it's only $30 or $50, then it's really just paying for someone to bother publishing and reading through it. Otherwise, as the internet is today, you could do nothing but read other people's guest posts.

The thing that matters is if the site is legit or a guest post farm or in the process of becoming one. Out of the last 20 blog posts, how many are paid?

You might also want to look into offering them a link exchange or social media mentions instead of money. Usually a legit webmaster will prefer those, because they can't buy a link for $50 anyway.
 
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I’ve been reaching out to websites in my niche regarding guest posting for a couple of weeks now and most of the time the websites want money to include a link in the article or our bio on the page. Is this normal? I don’t necessarily have an issue with paying $30 or $50 to acquire a backlink from a DA 20+ website (from a monetary view) but I’m worried about the long-lasting effects.

This may be a really basic and dumb question (because I think the answer is already “yes”) – but is this considered buying backlinks? And is this always a bad thing? The content being provided is quality and the websites being pitched aren’t spam; but so far pretty much every website that has responded wants to be paid to include a guest post on their website. Is funding guest posts in this way still considered whitehat SEO?

Previously, I only considered PBNs and services that provided you with “X backlinks of DA XX” to be buying backlinks but I’m ready to stand corrected.
This is the industry today. If you want results you got to pay.
No way around it I'm afraid. There is no way to go around the system. Competition is more fierce than ever in every niche. Even what were considered 'easy niches' in the past, have become more competitive nowadays
 

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Does mail.domain.com need SSL? If so, why?
 

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Does mail.domain.com need SSL? If so, why?
Yes, because you are still sending information to and from a server, so you want that connection to be secure
 

CCarter

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Does mail.domain.com need SSL? If so, why?
SSL encrypts communication between the server and your browser/mail program. That way someone at your ISP cannot see the content of what is being transmitted. They just know you computer is communicating with mail.domain.com. If it was unencrypted they would be able to view your emails' content at the ISP level, node level, traveling though the internet pipes, at your cellphone tower level, or simply by reading communication going through the wifi air.
 
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Shit tons of your images on shit foreign language blogspots with popup spam = cause for concern or ignore and back to the grind?
 

Ryuzaki

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Shit tons of your images on shit foreign language blogspots with popup spam = cause for concern or ignore and back to the grind?

If it was any other type of mass spam I'd tell you to ignore it. It was maybe 2 years ago, 3 years max that I saw that exact scheme get a site penalized. I was offered 50% to get it unpenalized and I determined it was dofollow links from a giant, automated blogspot web 2.0 PBN, where the links only hit image file URLs and never content URLs. It was still enough to land a link-based penalty, which was quickly reversed upon disavowing all of it.

Things could have changed since then, and I hope they have. The difference between blogspot image link spam and the image scrapers with their own CMS's on their own domains is the latter tend to drop off on their own over time. The blogspots are forever and seem less "footprinty" in terms of Google easily identifying it and ignoring it.
 

bernard

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When did Adsense become so strict?

I built a nice little directory site with content I scraped from Google Maps and a couple of hours of manual data entry, plus added some guides and a nice design, but it keeps getting rejected for thin content.

So Adsense basically won't allow Adsense on a site if it has "auto generated" template posts, regardless if it has a bunch of other content?
 
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If it was any other type of mass spam I'd tell you to ignore it. It was maybe 2 years ago, 3 years max that I saw that exact scheme get a site penalized.
Thanks for this, I think I will. It's largely foreign language and they have intrusive pop ups that redirect me to nefarious places. I'm down about 40% over the last few weeks, of course hard to determine precisely from what, but one thing at a time. Would be sweet if Google moderated/regulated their own wasteland of a blog platform..
 
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Pick boring/large niches so that your success is not limited by some tiny niche. Don't do the stuff everyone else is chasing, find the super boring stuff. There are so many billion-dollar niches that are incredibly unsaturated
Cool! Any good examples what you mean by large and boring niche?
 
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@Ryuzaki

I saw in one thread about email outreach, that you mentioned to avoid sending outreach mails form the regular email, to not burn the email address.
Should I create a new email address on my domain to send outreach mails or an entirely new domain with an email address to send outreach mails?
 

Ryuzaki

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@Ryuzaki

I saw in one thread about email outreach, that you mentioned to avoid sending outreach mails form the regular email, to not burn the email address.
Should I create a new email address on my domain to send outreach mails or an entirely new domain with an email address to send outreach mails?
I would either use an entirely different domain and IP address (and “warm the inbox”, you can search that term here for resources I’ve shared, sorry I’m on mobile) or I’d use a Gmail for superior inboxing. Using Amazon SES has superior inboxing too, but you’ll get booted for tooo much cold emailing, junk mail / spam designations, bounces, etc. A warmed Gmail is probably the best bet depending on how professional and brand oriented this campaign is.
 
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I would either use an entirely different domain and IP address (and “warm the inbox”, you can search that term here for resources I’ve shared, sorry I’m on mobile) or I’d use a Gmail for superior inboxing. Using Amazon SES has superior inboxing too, but you’ll get booted for tooo much cold emailing, junk mail / spam designations, bounces, etc. A warmed Gmail is probably the best bet depending on how professional and brand oriented this campaign is.
I'm using Google Workspace (G-suite) with my domain "myname at domain.com" That address would already be warmed-up. However, it is my major business address, that I don't want to put at risk. But you mean to create a new Gmail account, "myname at gmail.com" and warm it up to send mails for outreach campaigns. My plan isn't to be too aggressive and to send on average 10-30 mails per day.