Newbie Question(s) so dumb, you're afraid to even ask!

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Let's say you're doing outreach, and a webmaster gives you the freedom to add a link to any inner page on their site. Do you go for:

1. The most-authoritative page.
2. The most-trafficked page.
3. The most-relevant page.
4. A "middle ground" page that best combines the above factors.
The order I would go for would be:
4.
3.
2.
1.

If you can get a relevant page that has good links pointing to it and traffic flowing through it, that’s the ideal situation.

Otherwise, I’d be looking for a page that is hyper relevant to my page. If none exist, I’d look for a high traffic page or a page with a few good links pointing at it.
 
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Do you noindex your category pages?

Just found out that Genesis theme is noindexing category pages by default. I am using the category pages in my main menu and it's pretty much the only option to access the articles.

What's best practice here?
 

Ryuzaki

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Just found out that Genesis theme is noindexing category pages by default.
No, I do not do that and can't really think of any scenario where noindexing all of your category pages would ever make sense.

What I do is make /page/1/ of the categories worth indexing. I add some content (doesn't have to be a lot) to it that interlinks around a bit to keep the PageRank moving around since category pages receive a ton of it from site wide navigation links. This content helps it rank for terms too.

Then I noindex /page/2/ and forward, with all that content replaced with a little notice like "you're on page 5 of the archives, here are some other options." The reason I started noindexing those was because I didn't want to deal with indexation bloat with low quality pages (potential Panda issues).

So typically I like noindex but dofollow on those pages, but recently John Mueller said something about "if a page is noindex long enough we turn the links nofollow." Which is kind of dumb if you ask me but it does change things. I've yet to come up with any sensible action in regards to this new revelation and probably won't change my methods.

If I do change it, I'll make every single category page indexable & dofollow back to /page/999/, but try not to have that many by increasing the number of posts shown on each page drastically, making them more substantial for Google too.
 
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4. A "middle ground" page that best combines the above factors.
Try your luck and suggest the webmaster adds a sitewide footer link in the navigation? From what I know - these links are discredited - bit would get you the best bang for buck.
 

Ryuzaki

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From what I know - these links are discredited - bit would get you the best bang for buck.
How are you getting a bang for your buck if the links are discredited?

Also, I don't believe site-wide footer links are discredited. Old Money Men are buying up big sites online and interlinking them all as a network with the footers and getting huge boosts across the whole networks by doing this and dominating SERPs.
 
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I'm understanding that a contextual exact match money keyword found within in body content of a highly relevant article is king of kings in regards to safe white hat link building.

I also know that it's common practice to buy footer links, so I would assume SOME level of link equity reduction. i.e body, in content link vrs footer navi link? the body content link - all things being fair - should send more link juice.

Then again, the effort for a web master to update an existing post to do the body in content is high, so you would be better off asking for a footer navi link. (and get home page, and all the other pages, sitewide).
 

Ryuzaki

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@MuffinS, I agree with you. Contextual & Relevant with a good anchor is the king of links.

Google definitely knows the difference between navigational, supplementary (sidebar / footer), and main content and likely lets PageRank flow through them differently.

However, the quantity of those links across 100's or 1000's of pages can make up the difference easily. And that difference is a far cry from being discredited.

I use my own footers to funnel juice to specific pages. It works well, although those are internal links. I see it working like gangbusters for big sites with external links as mentioned above.

Here's a good write-up about it: http://www.viperchill.com/google-control/
 

Jared

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Does anyone have any examples of high-quality blogging-style affiliate landing pages they can share?

Thanks.
 
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I changed the url structure of a blog post. Instead of www.domain.com/all-about-xvz now its just /about-xvz


Now, when I type /all-about-xvz it redirects me to /about-xvz. But... When I go to GW under HTML improvements it shows me duplicate content. What should I do? I started to get traffic on /about-xvz but I'm concerned about that duplicate content thing. And it also has duplicate title tags.
 
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Now, when I type /all-about-xvz it redirects me to /about-xvz. But... When I go to GW under HTML improvements it shows me duplicate content. What should I do? I started to get traffic on /about-xvz but I'm concerned about that duplicate content thing. And it also has duplicate title tags.
Does it still show this? It sounds like they spotted the issue and reported it before the system had time to understand it was a 301 redirect.
 

Ryuzaki

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Does anyone have any examples of high-quality blogging-style affiliate landing pages they can share?
A great resource for this kind of thing is to hit up the e-marketing section of Clickbank. It's the really cheesy "used car salesman" style of selling online, like you see all of the people on Warrior Forum trying to emulate.

It looks really stupid to us because we know the game and feel like we need to be more sophisticated, but the reality is this stuff works like gangbusters on normal people. Of course you'd change it up depending on the niche and then split test, but this should get your neurons firing.

Code:
http://dayjobdestroyer.com
http://clickbankuniversity.com/go/offer/
Here's a couple I grabbed. They aren't specific ones I'm endorsing. I didn't even read them. I just looked for a visual style that I wanted to share. On the 2nd one, make sure you use that specific URL, otherwise you end up in a video squeeze page.
 
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I changed the url structure of a blog post. Instead of www.domain.com/all-about-xvz now its just /about-xvz


Now, when I type /all-about-xvz it redirects me to /about-xvz. But... When I go to GW under HTML improvements it shows me duplicate content. What should I do? I started to get traffic on /about-xvz but I'm concerned about that duplicate content thing. And it also has duplicate title tags.
If you've verified your redirects, I wouldn't worry about it. In Google Search Console, a lot of the various items they track have a reporting delay. Certain reports seem to update only once every week or 2, depending somewhat on the size of your site and crawl rate I'm sure.
 
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I'm not sure what you mean by verifying redirects, I just changed the url of the blog post in Wordpress posts->edit.

But hey guys, you were right. I logged today and there are no issues under HTML improvements. Thanks.
 

Calamari

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Let's say you're doing outreach, and a webmaster gives you the freedom to add a link to any inner page on their site. Do you go for:

1. The most-authoritative page.
2. The most-trafficked page.
3. The most-relevant page.
4. A "middle ground" page that best combines the above factors.
Relevance, link to pages that readers will find useful.
 
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I'm not sure what you mean by verifying redirects, I just changed the url of the blog post in Wordpress posts->edit.

But hey guys, you were right. I logged today and there are no issues under HTML improvements. Thanks.
I just meant checking the old links to make sure they properly 301 redirect to the new location. There are many tools that help with this. For example, here's a Chrome plugin, Link Redirect Trace, that'll let you easily check links.

The nice thing is, by default, Wordpress has you covered. I posted recently about a built-in old slug redirect function that handles this for you automatically.
 
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Okay, so this is a really green question.

I've seen the phrase "we're not here to win pulitzers" banded about on BuSo but as I find myself trying to perfect my first piece of skyscraper content, I was just wondering this:

To a certain degree, is any content better than no content?

I'm not talking about using spun content or $1 per 100 word articles but content that is free of gramatical errors, makes sense but prehaps doesn't quite have the polish of a magazine article or the depth of a blog post by an industry pro.

I think this is the first time self doubt has come to visit me.
 

CCarter

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To a certain degree, is any content better than no content?
You can always go back and edit or have an editor edit your content. You can’t gain back the time lost/wasted trying to perfect each piece. You think BuzzFeed is going through self-doubt on what they publish?

Realistically are scientist, doctors, or english majors going through your content looking for some minor error to call you out on? No, but even if they are thank them for the free edits and don’t think twice about them.

Really your problem is you are worried what people think about you or whether you are worthy of the next level. Stop thinking. If this is what is stopping you then you are too comfortable in life. You are not hungry. If you were starving you wouldn’t have time for doubts.

The best thing you can do is the right move, the 2nd best thing you can do is the wrong move. The worst thing you can do is nothing. Right now you are doing nothing.

At least with the wrong move you can correct course cause you have momentum. This is covered in the Mental Strength Day of the DSCC.
 

Jared

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Anyone have any tips for beating Disqus? I know they're strict, and like to ban entire domains if you get too careless.

I have an account with 500+ comments, and 6,000+ upvotes. Do you think this is established enough to where I can aggressively promote my site?
 

dopeideas

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What would you be general approach and strategy trying to sell a domain quality name? I know how domain holders can feel their names are overvalued, but I believe this one can fetch in the xx,xxx range.

Unfortunately, I was never a great domainer and I can be potentially over-firm on the price if have a very interested buyer (i.e. he contacts me).

Additionally, how would you weigh developing a potential name vrs. selling it for a quick buck? Developed it has use potential, great branding, memorable name, but there are modest time and skillset restrictions already.
 

Potatoe

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What would you be general approach and strategy trying to sell a domain quality name? I know how domain holders can feel their names are overvalued, but I believe this one can fetch in the xx,xxx range.

Unfortunately, I was never a great domainer and I can be potentially over-firm on the price if have a very interested buyer (i.e. he contacts me).

Additionally, how would you weigh developing a potential name vrs. selling it for a quick buck? Developed it has use potential, great branding, memorable name, but there are modest time and skillset restrictions already.
This is probably pretty general advice, it's tough to say without knowing the name and knowing your experience etc, but if this is all stuff that's obvious to you already, maybe it'll come in useful for someone else.

First thing is to determine who would find value from the domain name, and you can reach out to them directly or look into hiring a broker who can shop the name around if it's truly an xx,xxx name. Check out namebio.com and see if you can find any comparable sales.

You could look at selling it to an existing business, or there's also crossing your fingers and hoping a business is formed down the road that would benefit from your name and want it enough to pay that much (Or passing it off to a reseller who also believes in it, but you'd make less this way). There are some really solid domain names out there but they're entirely reliant on a very specific business choosing a very specific name, so it can be hit or miss even with decent names when you start looking at the higher price tags, whereas those same names might get passed around between resellers for years and years hoping for the end user to come into existence.

Ask yourself how many other options there are for them to choose from too - is 'yourname.com' a must-have if they want to enter this industry (Like if they're the world's newest biggest stapler company who are finally looking to get online, and you have Staplers.com), or are there many other options out there that might be about as good?

As for developing it vs selling it... If you believe you have a name worth xx,xxx and you're not sure if you should sell or develop it - would you be willing to invest xx,xxx into this new website if you didn't have the domain already? If yes, you should keep it. If you could find another name for $10 that would still be a suitable choice, I'd lean towards selling it.

I usually look at selling assets this way: If I wouldn't be willing to buy it for the price I could sell it for, I should sell it.
 
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as I find myself trying to perfect my first piece of skyscraper content:
The definition of a skyscraper piece of content is to get it out there, and then keep building upon it at one level at a time (building upon article length, article quality and popularity). Why not take what you have, post it, let it index, get some age, and then apply improvements progressively? The best piece of content is worthless if it isn't indexed. As long as it is 80% ok... post it! Your first piece will always be the worst, but as long as it has OK high-quality traits (Menu, On page, Images, Outbound links to authority, over 2000 word count) then Google will appreciate it.
 

stackcash

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The definition of a skyscraper piece of content is to get it out there, and then keep building upon it at one level at a time (building upon article length, article quality and popularity).
This is incorrect.

The "skyscraper" term was coined by Brian Dean of Backlinko and refers to building on the content already published on the topic. You take all the available content on the topic, combine it into a single piece of content (in your own words - no plagiarizing!), add more content to it, and make sure it's "better" than everything else currently available. You then take this piece of great content and reach out to all the websites that are currently linking to the websites competing for the same topic/keyword and ask them to link to your new, better, piece of content instead.

You always want to iterate any of your content in today's environment, yes... but, that is not unique to the skyscraper technique.

And, as far as posting less-than-stellar content at first and then going back to "fix it" later.... the answer is.... it depends.

A $1 per 100 writer on textbroker will give you some shitty ass content. But, it'll allow you to get the page up, get your slug right, get your headers right, index the page for your target keyword, and get the page aging.

The page is very unlikely to rank in the top 20 with this type of content unless its target keyword competition is uniquely low.

And, if you do happen to jump up into the top 10 with this low-quality content, you probably won't stay there for long. It's unlikely that visitors will have their needs met by the shitty content... which will lead to high bounce rates, low dwell time, and a low # of pages per visit...... all things that will send you back into the depths of nothingness.

I suppose there's a strategy where you can post up 50+ pages of shitty, low-cost content and wait to see which page(s) rank the best. Then, you can go back to the best performing pages and "update" them one by one. But, buying 50+ pages of shitty content in bulk is the same thing as just buying 2-3 pieces of really nice, high-quality content. I guess I just don't see the point of spinning my wheels. I'm just going to do it right the first time.

But, as @CCarter pointed out... you do need to stop thinking and start doing. You want to shoot for high-quality, but you should realize it's not going to be perfect. Just do your best, wait and see how it does, and then go back and make incremental improvements. At the end of the day, that's what all of us are doing anyway.