How much did you sacrifice?

Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
69
Likes
38
Points
0
LOL

So, Magister, have you done anything of all you talk about?
 
Joined
Jun 24, 2015
Messages
42
Likes
18
Points
0
Where do you think I'm wrong? More successful people have been telling that all the time.
 

Ryuzaki

お前はもう死んでいる
Moderator
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Messages
4,689
Likes
9,045
Points
9
I agree with @Magister, if we're not going to be dishonest about what he typed.

A lot, and I'd venture to say most, people that end up achieving a full time status in business did so in the few hours they had after their day job and on the weekend after chores and whatever else. That's how I did it. Yes, I worked more total hours than the average person, but I worked maybe 25 hours on the business per week. This is the lower tier 4 figures per month Magister is talking about. Totally doable and pretty typical.

And then he's talking about the 5 and 6 figures per month. Once you go full time, if you're serious, you'll end up working some pretty wild hours at first. If you want to dig through the trenches of mud and piss fast, you're looking at long hours. There were years where I routinely did 12-14 hours a day, 7 days a week until my brain forced me to take a single day off, which ended up being half-days anyways.

Eventually if you're not a moron, you start to automate and outsource and hire employees. Then you can return back to a normal lifestyle of 8 hours, 10 hours, and still have time to hit the gym, have a meal with the bros, tuck your kids into bed, etc.

Why in the world would I work a million hours a week if I'm making $100k per month, when I can hire every bit of it out, hire managers to run it all, and then scale further by increasing the team size. You can even hire people to hire and fire and train.

There is a period of time where you'll work like nobody else desires to work. Hopefully you graduate out of that mess. It's a rite of passage and a necessity and a barrier to entry into the big leagues. It's fun bragging rights too.

But that's not the end of the story. The end of the story is getting in 5,000 hours of other people's time per week while you do jack shit but enjoy the abundance of money and time that you earned.

Easier said than done though. I know most of us would start a new project to remain anxious and hungry about. People who break into the big time do this as a lifestyle, not as a path to escape an easier lifestyle.

But yes, newbies should be prepared to work a lot for a few years or even a decade if it takes that long, including sacrificing stuff, starting with time wasters, as Magister pointed out. Work efficiently so you can still have time to be human.