Which is the best e-commerce platform?

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I've been speaking to a supplier who can provide me products to sell as part of my website bit I was wondering which is the best platform at the moment?

Or, is it better to create something (would be in ruby/rails)?
 
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If you don't know what you're doing, Shopify. If you know Russian, Magento. If you need a high level of customization, something on PHP or RoR or whatever.
 
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I've looked at Magento a few years ago and the codebase looked mental then. I assume it's still the same
 
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I would suggest Prestashop.
You can do a lot yourself, or with free themes if you know your way around the web.
For me it was the simplest.

I managed with a little work to make one of my websites look more like a blog with integrated web-shop, than the other way around.

If your website is already in Wordpress, I'm sure you can find other solutions.
 
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I've looked at Magento a few years ago and the codebase looked mental then. I assume it's still the same
The documentation is in Russian, the last time I checked. They used Russian logic, not English logic too.

Pretty smart of the Russians. If you go with Magento, you end up hiring Russian developers. How clever.
 
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I've had no problems with Wordpress - Woocommerce is pretty good these days and fine for most stores. Depends what your experience is really.
 
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@Tucky - completely forgot about Woocommerce! Unless I start selling a few hundred SKU's this is perfect.
 

BCN

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Woocommerce if it's a website with e-commerce as an afterthought. Shopify for lower volume stores. Magento is good, but a bit overkill for smaller stores.
 
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@BCN my only worries about Shopify are speed and SEO - SEO isn't a huge deal as I'm going to run some FB ads to the products but it would be nice to make the site lightning fast. Think I need to do more research before I commit.
 
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@BCN my only worries about Shopify are speed and SEO - SEO isn't a huge deal as I'm going to run some FB ads to the products but it would be nice to make the site lightning fast. Think I need to do more research before I commit.
Do you have any data that Shopify is slow?
 
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I'd suggest Prestashop.
You can customize it quite a bit. Most themes aren't free, but if you know your way around the internet I think you can find whatever you need.
Every option has some downsides, for me Prestashop had the fewest.

You could also look at OpenCart.
 

BCN

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I actually had a very simple "ecom" case this week. It only has one product_type (course), and will create a user, prompt for payment (stripe), and depending on the product bought, the user gets access to a certain course_collection (a collection of pages and resources).

So, in the end, we can have many courses, but it will only sell courses.

So it's ecom with a membership area essentially. High ticket items backed by a call-center, to give some context.

I first thought about hacking it together in woo-commerce and some membership plugin, but then I started to build it in Django/Python.

In about 10 hours I've set up

CTA (user will do a search from API and find their listing)
User signup
User payment via Stripe (storing the stripe key in DB)
Discount codes
Course content
Docker setup for dev and production
Queue system for async tasks (sending emails, scraping data, sending push notifications) with RabbitMQ message broker
Email support form
Transactional email via Amazon SES.

The only remaining parts are the SSL provision in docker and deploying it live on AWS. It will take another 10-15 hours to get it live on AWS with all the bells and whistles.

This is just to prove that a custom solution isn't always more expensive than going for a premade one - it really depends on the use case.

The future cost is also much lower, as I've frequently ran into problems with woo-commerce and Shopify for trivial things, so adding a new feature next month might take 3 hours on my own system of 20 in Wordpress.

I'm sure you can find someone on Upwork to build this for very cheap - but you would need someone to maintain it.

If it's "just" a standard ecom thing, with a shopping cart, products, payments and order generation, I would do Shopify. They are cloud-hosted, have good uptime, and a tech team working on the stack. It saves you a lot of headaches from having to run your own Wordpress install.

Woo-commerce also seems hacky, as your twisting Wordpress into something it's not. It's almost like that fake meat that's made off beats or broccoli or whatever it is. Beats are meant to be a vegetable and are delicious the way they are, but don't try to make it look like pulled pork ...

Woocommerce can also get really slow as the database gets bigger.

A friend has a large store with hundreds of thousands of products (CD, DVS, Games etc.). He also paid someone to build it in Laravel, as they work with a different inventory management system - and building their own was easier.

Anyways, point being: think about the use case. How many products? Will you do something outside the box? Is it just plain old ecom? I'm an advocate for not reinventing the wheel and love good out of the box solutions. But sometimes it's worth asking yourself if a wheel is really what you need.
 

Golan

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If WordPress, not only WooCommerce, Easy Digital Downloads (EDD) is also very decent if you sell non tangible products, and in many ways easier and lighter than WooCommerce.