What does a modern personal/portfolio website look like today?

bernard

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I want to get a combined personal/business website, which should have several features:
  • Front page with 1 or more personal pictures
  • Services (sales page)
  • "As seen in/on" (portfolio page of mentions and stuff I've written to media)
  • Blog
Did you notice anyone having such a page that you thought looked good?
 

Ryuzaki

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I think there's a lot of pressure to make a portfolio site look extra amazing, but realistically I don't think it's important. I think user experience and a clean presentation of the information still wins.

What you've described seems to follow the trend I feel like I've seen where pure portfolio sites have been left behind as have the personal sites. I see the trend as being a regular old website with personal branding. And the domain often doesn't include the person's name any more.

I "blame" three people for this:
Notice how they're all starting to look very similar:


I tossed in a site I hadn't heard of before this morning at the end: OneHourProfessor. Here's NicheSiteProject.com:


We could do this all day. The trend seems to be minimal and flat design without any frills. Just cutting straight to the information. That's especially if you're not a web designer or UI tweaker, etc.

Of course, then you have an example of going completely overboard, like the SEO Ancient of Old Bruce Clay's new design. But if you strip away all of the flashy and moving parts, it's not any different than the ones I posted above.

All of this is a big departure from the old "business card" websites we used to make for portfolio sites just to have an online presence. They're now full blown websites and treated as such, just backed by a personal brand. And why not? There's huge money to be earned if you can first earn trust through transparency and consistency of quality. And this "full blown website" should be the top of the funnel.
 

bernard

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Thanks @Ryuzaki, that's exactly the inspiration I'm looking for.

When we're talking about old portfolio/business cards being dead, and the trend being a niche website with personal branding, would you still want to include non-niche stuff? Like, if you've been featured in multiple niches, like some people are.

Writers and journalists as an example. You have your journalism, you have your business writing services, you have your debating business, maybe you run a website on a hobby niche.

How would you handle that, would you split it up into different websites, or keep it on one site? Maybe blog about all those topics? Personally, I would be the most worried about anything that looks like politics, even if it technically isn't, because that turns potential clients off fast if they don't agree.
 

Ryuzaki

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@bernard, I'd ask myself what the purpose of this website is for. Then act accordingly. If you're building it to sell a service, then I'd try to keep it focused on that.

If I was a journalist / writer / copywriter, then I'd include all of that, but I wouldn't include anything about my golf hobby site. It's too off-topic. I'd mention it perhaps, only in passing to say that I write, write, write.

It's kind of like an adult's resume. Eventually you have to go back in and scrub out the crap like "Honor Roll Student in High School 4 years in a row" and "Chess Club Captain and Senior Class President". Nobody cares. That may have helped when we get our first fast food job, but not when we're applying for a salaried position or selling services.

And yeah, leave politics out unless that's your actual business. It's one of the basic, most fundamental rules of business and polite society, to leave politics out of it. Dummies are so radicalized now that they're losing half of their customer base by opening their big fat mouths. Gillette did that recently and posted a 5.24 billion loss in one quarter. It's just dumb and has nothing to do with business.

I wouldn't make multiple sites. Big money comes from being specialized. I'd choose what my sole purpose of building the site is (maybe to sell make-up products) and leave anything unrelated to that off of the site. Focus and specialization is the name of the game when it comes to this kind of thing, I think. You don't want to be the Jack of All Trades and the Master of None in the eyes of your potential clients.
 
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And yeah, leave politics out unless that's your actual business. It's one of the basic, most fundamental rules of business and polite society, to leave politics out of it. Dummies are so radicalized now that they're losing half of their customer base by opening their big fat mouths.
I had a sales call yesterday with a 20-something from Maine and the first topic that came out of his mouth was Donald Trump's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. This wasn't the reason why I declined working with him (budget was) but it immediately knocked a point or two off of my "how did that call go" scale. Not to mention the fact that it wasn't relevant to the whole point of the sales call to begin with.