Starting a Youtube Channel in Make Money Online Niche

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Greetings builders,

I have been thinking about starting a youtube channel focused on niche websites and making money online in general. I know that the competition is intense but I was wondering if there are any angles I could take that have not already been explored and exploited.

I have been following a few YouTubers who have grown pretty fast with some interesting videos. Think $10000 from scratch challenge, niche reveals, giveaways, etc. A similar hot trend is getting featured on other Youtube channels in the niche. I think this kind of content has viral potential and gets that view velocity going organically with a little bit of promotion.

Another interesting Youtuber is Anastasia. She claims to have gotten a lot of traction for her channel using Pinterest.

I am not scared of putting my face out there and I think I have the panache for youtube. I am not gonna pose as a gUrU because that is an uphill battle and I am not going to restrict myself to blogging in general.

In terms of setup, I have good lighting, a camera, and several microphones. I can easily hire a cheap video editor to get things going fast and produce a video a day.

I know how much info newbies getting into the industry consume. So I think

Things I am concerned about include not being American or White (less relatability), not being able to fake an accent, and not wanting to be seen as one of those third-world dudes with crappy incoherent content.
Another thing that scares me is seeing people like Doug (KGR guy) just stagnating on Youtube.

I would love to hear what you guys think about starting a channel in this niche. If I go ahead with it, I will start a lab thread for the youtube channel.
 
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mikey3times

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Things I am concerned about include not being American or White (less relatability), not being able to fake an accent, and not wanting to be seen as one of those third-world dudes with crappy incoherent content.
Can these be advantages? Maybe people are looking for non-white, non-American professional bloggers? I don’t know...just asking.
 
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Can these be advantages? Maybe people are looking for non-white, non-American professional bloggers? I don’t know...just asking.
I see your perspective but I am sure there are other non-American bloggers and makemoneyonliners out there but I don't see anyone becoming huge in the States. Something tells me that there are impalpable barriers to entry.

Growing domestically is easier but less profitable. So I would rather block these countries (including mine xD) than bother with them.
 

Ryuzaki

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Things I am concerned about include not being American or White (less relatability), not being able to fake an accent, and not wanting to be seen as one of those third-world dudes with crappy incoherent content.
From my own perspective, I could give a damn what a person looks like or sounds like. I care about the value they're providing, and I think if you're showing revenue statements that act as your own "social proof" then you'll be in fine shape. I wouldn't let these concerns stop you. The biggest SEO guy on Youtube in Neil Patel, an Indian feller. It's not stopping him in the slightest.

Another thing that scares me is seeing people like Doug (KGR guy) just stagnating on Youtube.
I've watched a few of his videos recently. The problem, in my opinion, is that his production quality is low and his content is dry and long-winded. He's firing up his "webcam with mic included" and doing little editing. And his interviews are on Skype calls or some equivalent and they don't seem to be doing mic level checks and other tiny things that help out.

I think he could turn it all around with some lighting, a better mic, and some decorations in his room, etc. None of that inspires faith that he's killing it in the game, you know, especially when the main claim to fame is "go after keywords with tiny volume."

It's an unfortunate storm of variables that give off the wrong idea, all of which could be fixed by the next video if he takes the initiative. Youtube has become more mature, especially in this niche. Low effort videos simply don't cut it any more.
 
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I think someone that is doing very well with building his Youtube channel from nothing is Craig Campbell, where the production values are minimal but he is getting traction by appealing to different segments and chatting to people who would be suitable for those different niches. He is also getting good watch time metrics by using that strategy.
For example, I watched the whole hour of the first episode of the newest series he started with Brad Mabry and Mike Pearse. Some of the other people he has on don't do it for me but that's fine, I'm sure they do for other people. (Incidentally, @CaptainHustle, he and a number of his guests are not American and/or not white.)
 

bernard

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Generally I think people from low income countries seem far too concerned with making it in the US. I realise that the average income is a lot less lower in a country like India, but ... there's a BILLION people there and americans can't get involved because of the language difficulty!

I would be thrilled at such an opportunity. Imagine having a growing home market of one billion people and all the american pros couldn't get involved because of the language. Wow!
 

Boy

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There's a major difference between people that make YouTube videos and YouTubers. If you want to be a YouTuber, you need those high-quality drone shots, next edge transitions, perfect audio & video, and all that.

If you want to make videos and use YouTube as a medium, take what you have, and start producing.

You seem to be under the impression that you need thousands of video views and thousands of subscribers to have success on the platform. Don't go in expecting some viral hit to explode you to 100k subs. Just make the next video.

For every 100k subscriber account you know about, there are a million 0 subscriber accounts that quit. But there are also 100s of 500, 1k, 2k, 4k, 10k accounts you have yet to know about but they're doing alright.

Look up Kyle Milligan. 4k subs, 280 videos. Probably makes less than $100 from YouTube ads if they're even activated on his account. But he has a $12 copywriting book that he pitches in every video. There's an $87 upsell on that order form. He has a $79/month membership. He's probably getting clients left and right for his direct response copywriting.
Another thing that scares me is seeing people like Doug (KGR guy) just stagnating on Youtube.
If you check SocialBlade, Doug is getting 5.5k views daily on average. That's either someone new viewing his shit or someone going further into his funnel. Stagnant? If you say so.

Shoot, even my channel gets around 200 views a day. 200 viewers either being introduced or clicking links. Signing up. Making me money.
 

southpaw

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Generally I think people from low income countries seem far too concerned with making it in the US. I realise that the average income is a lot less lower in a country like India, but ... there's a BILLION people there and americans can't get involved because of the language difficulty!
To add to the billion people: last year, I spoke to a guy from rural Punjab, India. He produces content for people from the Punjab.

Because Punjabi speakers are a visible presence in Tier 1 EN countries (US/UK/CA/AU), his Adsense income from the expat audience gives him a very comfortable lifestyle.

Something to consider: the 'where' can be more profitable than the 'who'.
 
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Another thing that scares me is seeing people like Doug (KGR guy) just stagnating on Youtube.
The view counts you'll be seeing publically won't tell the whole story. I manage a channel that got 3000 views on its last video that was uploaded 6 days ago- the channel has gotten over 182,000 views in the last 28 days. There are channels that upload 1000 views and get 10 views per video per day on average- 10,000 views a day.
 
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Just wanted to chime in with another comment...

If you do want to pursue YouTube, make sure you actually "go for it." A lot of people like to throw together some videos on the side, ignore video SEO and thumbnails etc. Basically, a lot of people pursue YouTube lazily. It's not as easy or as hard as people make it seem. The hardest part about YouTube marketing is adopting the right mindset and becoming an efficient content creator.

I'll give it to you straight: If you're not prepared to spend the next year creating videos and failing a ton, don't bother. If you're not prepared to upload a minimum of 3 videos a week, don't bother. I've got a handful of clients who only upload 1 to 2 new videos each week, and even as someone with 10+ years of experience and numerous success stories, I can't help them grow- they simply don't create enough content.
I have been following a few YouTubers who have grown pretty fast with some interesting videos. Think $10000 from scratch challenge, niche reveals, giveaways, etc.
Keep in mind that these aren't the most search-friendly or evergreen topics. These topics work well for channels that already have some momentum, but you'll be spinning your wheels if you try to create "unique" content at first.
Another interesting Youtuber is Anastasia. She claims to have gotten a lot of traction for her channel using Pinterest.
She also has a Pinterest course that she sells, so just be aware that it's in her best interest to convince people that "Pinterest is the answer" (I don't know who she is BTW- she could be as legit as they come).
I can easily hire a cheap video editor to get things going fast and produce a video a day.
Be careful with this. It might seem like a good idea to outsource the video editing to a cheap editor in a developing country, but they might end up costing you more time due to incompetence. Editors are notorious for not finishing things on time- even the expensive ones.
Things I am concerned about include not being American or White (less relatability), not being able to fake an accent, and not wanting to be seen as one of those third-world dudes with crappy incoherent content.
Your race or gender doesn't matter. People just use this as a reason for their lack of success. Of course, these same people usually only upload 5 videos and wonder why they aren't famous yet, lol. Oh, and you won't seem like a typical third-world email spammer if your videos are recorded above 480p and you provide value.
 

CCarter

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People are so scared of success they spend more time diving deep on why this will fail to validate their own insecurities. People only dive deep and Googlefuck things to validate their perspectives, and most of their perspectives are negative.

“Provide value to your audience” it literally is a lot simpler than you guys make it out. In fact you don’t need to be unique at any level, you can go to Quora and research questions being asked within your industry and record yourself answering and interpreting the top answers.

There are literally YouTubers that provide commentary on VIDEO GAMES!!
 
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“Provide value to your audience” it literally is a lot simpler than you guys make it out. In fact you don’t need to be unique at any level, you can go to Quora and research questions being asked within your industry and record yourself answering and interpreting the top answers.
Exactly this. There are literally people who go on CNN or Fox or wherever and read news articles- that's it. There are people who just read Reddit threads- they're literally using other people's created content for their own videos.

You can find plenty of examples of low-effort content performing well on YouTube. Knowing this, recognize that your videos don't need to be produced in Hollywood. The more videos you create, the easier creating videos will become. If you sit around and overthink the video-side of things, then you'll be in trouble.
 
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Your race or gender doesn't matter. People just use this as a reason for their lack of success. Of course, these same people usually only upload 5 videos and wonder why they aren't famous yet, lol. Oh, and you won't seem like a typical third-world email spammer if your videos are recorded above 480p and you provide value.
Thank you so much for all this. Especially, being careful about going for unique video ideas at the start and about hiring a video editor.

I will also heed CCarter's advice about providing value in ways that are not exactly unique.

Anyhow, I wanted to get the ball rolling with some starting momentum.

Sent some emails to some other people in the niche with some juicy stats of my new site. They want to interview me for their podcast and youtube channel. I committed.

I am not sure if the youtube channel will click or not but I am gonna go all-in on this. Ordered all the gear I needed.

Thank you.
 
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I am not sure if the youtube channel will click or not but I am gonna go all-in on this. Ordered all the gear I needed.
You'll never know if you don't try! Keep in mind, you won't be perfect at the start. Like with anything, becoming good at speaking and/or being on camera takes time. If you stick with it, however, it will become easier.