Launching a New Website - What's Your Process?

Joined
Mar 19, 2019
Messages
100
Likes
88
Degree
0
Hi everyone!

I'm in the process of getting ready to launch my first serious website (journey thread coming soon). So far, I've written 5500 (give or take) words spread across 5 informational posts/articles.

My question is: When do you usually launch your websites? Meaning, do you write up 10,000 words worth of content and then drip-feed new posts/articles each week? For example, 1 article a week for the next 5 weeks, 2000 words each. Or, do you just let it rip and publish all 5 articles on the same day?

I'm thinking about maybe having 10,000 words all ready to go and then drip-feeding posts for the next 2 months (8 posts, 2 published each week). But, will this do me any favours in the eyes of Google, or am I better off just publishing all 8 posts right away to show maximum activity on my website?

Any insight would me much appreciated.

Thanks,
Daniel
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
368
Likes
268
Degree
1
Doesn't matter.

Matt Cutts covered this in a webmaster hangouts awhile back. The only time it matters is, lets say, you release a site with 100,000 pages or some other huge amount of pages that it'll be hard for GoogleBot to index. Then you'll have an issue and need to plan how you roll out the site.

8 posts, if I were you, just post them and keep writing. You're making too much of a big deal out of something trivial.
 

Ryuzaki

女性以上のお金
Staff member
BuSo Pro
Digital Strategist
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Messages
4,068
Likes
7,787
Degree
8
Yeah, John Mueller said they can have a hard time determining what your site is about if you overload them with too much content right off the bat. But that's in the huge ranges, not ~10 posts.

When it comes to SEO, there's hardly ever a benefit to waiting. I'm sure I could dredge up some scenario, but off the top of my head nothing is coming. I'd say to always publish when ready and let pages begin aging in the index.

When I launch, I like to have a solid 10-20 posts ready and all of the boiler plate content, for two reasons. 1) That's what it ends up taking for me to design all the various parts of the site anyways, and 2) because I don't want it to be a complete ghost town if I start getting visitors. But even #2 here isn't a good enough reason to not go ahead and publish.