Is it wrong of me to have a goal like...

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So I've got a question that I've had on my mind for years. Is it bad to have a goal of being financially free? Everyone says don't focus on the money, focus on creating solutions. Which I agree with, but at the end of the day it's all towards becoming financially free

So is it wrong of me to ultimately just want to be financially free and not really care how I get there?
 

BoxF

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Firstly.


While most people will try to steer you towards their beliefs you need to do one thing, which is? Listen to yourself. Financial freedom is 100% opinionated and unfortunately (from experience) very hard to obtain.

Unless you're as humble as Warren Buffet, your ideals and expectations will evolve endlessly as you experience more and more-- There's nothing wrong with this.

Strive to be the best you and honestly when people will try to tell you to hit the reset button.

**CLICK**



At the end of the day, go for it.

 
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Have a goal for yourself which you feel will make you happy. This is the best goal.
 

Ryuzaki

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So is it wrong of me to ultimately just want to be financially free and not really care how I get there?
No, there's nothing wrong with a goal like that. There's no real ethics or morality issues, assuming you don't mean you're willing to cheat others or rob a bank, etc.

The problem with goals like that is they're too vague to provide specific meaning. Without that level of meaning, the goal isn't likely to provide motivation, inspire discipline, or reveal a path to achieving the goal.

I'd look at this main goal as an umbrella goal, a main node goal which needs to be broken down into smaller goals.

For instance, what does Financial Independence mean? Everyone can call it what they want, but it starts with owning property in order to reduce expenses so you can put your cash flow to work for you.

So a beginning step might be paying off your monthly credit card payments and getting out from under debt. Once you've done that, then you need to start getting rid of good debt, like paying off your car, then considering your living situation. Owning a house or condo would mean there's a fairly sizable chunk of money monthly that you can now invest instead of send out to a bank or landlord every month.

The point of the above paragraph is that there's some obvious baby steps we all have to take towards financial freedom. We might diverge after that, but it can still be broken down into steps, and each step will come with a set of questions like:
  1. how much will it cost
  2. how will I make this money
  3. why do I want or need this
  4. what are the ramifications of achieving this step
#1 provides a milestone. #2 provides a framework that brings forth the creativity and innovation. #3 and #4 provide the "why" that summons the inspiration that brings motivation and discipline.

Because face it, everyone on the planet has the goal of Financial Freedom. Even the laziest bastard on the planet has that goal. It's how you break the goal down into S.M.A.R.T. goals that separates you from the lazy man using it as escapism.

I say it all the time. For most, these goals are just pressure release valves designed to make them feel a virtual sense of progress but one that removes the impulse to actually do anything. For most, the dream itself is tastier than the achievement, because the latter actually requires an enormous amount of work. The dream gives you the dopamine hit immediately without any effort.

Without action, it's a dream. It's like playing a video game or reading a fantasy novel.

You have to refine your goals if they're going to be worth anything, because otherwise they don't inspire action. And action is what gets you to your goal.

There's definitely nothing "wrong" with your goal other than it not really being a goal. Right now it's a pie in the sky. You need goals that come with the instructions on how to build a ladder to reach the sky and give you the impetus to grab a hammer and nails.
 

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No, it's a great goal.

Most of the problems in people's lives come from lack of money or scarcity towards money. Financial dependence leads to people living shitty lives in shitty marriages with shitty jobs they don't like. If people had financial independence, they'd be happier.

People that say they have some bs goal of saving the world, usually aren't as honest.

Many make these grandiose fluffy goals because their real goals are acknowledgment, status or some other self-centered thing.

Some people say they want to travel, but they want to be a well-traveled person, not to actually travel.

Some people say they want to have many kids, and they really want to not be old without kids.

Some people say they want to be a doctor and do medical research to cure cancer, but they want to be known as the doctor who cured cancer ...

Others say they want to invent some environmentally friendly XYZ, and their real goal is to get acknowledgment for inventing an environmentally friendly XYZ ...

Many might say money in itself is a bad goal, as it's material, self-centered and cold .. but money and financial freedom is an honest and more sound goal than most.
 

mikey3times

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Financial freedom is your “why”. It is why you are in the game. But, dig a little deeper like a five-year-old would do (why? why? why?)

Why do you want to be financially free? That might help you determine if your end goal is noble.

I’d also venture a guess that you DO care how you get there. Are you willing to lie, cheat, steal, or kill to be financially free?
I hope not.
 
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People that say they have some bs goal of saving the world, usually aren't as honest.

Many make these grandiose fluffy goals because their real goals are acknowledgment, status or some other self-centered thing.

Some people say they want to travel, but they want to be a well-traveled person, not to actually travel.

Some people say they want to have many kids, and they really want to not be old without kids.

Some people say they want to be a doctor and do medical research to cure cancer, but they want to be known as the doctor who cured cancer ...

Others say they want to invent some environmentally friendly XYZ, and their real goal is to get acknowledgment for inventing an environmentally friendly XYZ ...
Cathartic release all over my keyboard.

As for the topic at hand, it's definitely my goal as well. Work is the #1 thing that takes up your time, so it makes sense to want to be free of that enslavement.

But... it's easy to get into a toxic/poverty mindset if you focus on the don'ts... like not having to work. I have recently been focusing on the things I will do (that I cannot do now) once I achieve various levels of financial freedom, and that has made me feel much more inspired.