GDPR

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#26
I think this was a neccessary measure to protect our data and the way these companies use them. I feel much better this is in place after the Facebook debacle.

I don't think it's that difficult to find the "global revenue" of any comapny. If they're a "mom and pop" operation, they won't have any global revenue to speak of and tax data would be enough for any court to estimate income and leverage any fines.

Regarding this dude suing Google/Facebook - anyone can file a lawsuit against anyone - if Google and Facebook have implemented GDPR rules, and they've had plenty of time to do it, the course could easily get thrown out before passing the first hurdle - they spends 10s of millions of dollars a year on their legal teams, if they ever lose a case like this, it would be a big screw up and they'll have only themselves to blame.
 

darkzerothree

DunkelNullDrei
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#27
That guy already won his first cases against Google and WhatsApp.
(Right to be forgotten)

He is now targeting them for GDPR.

Also "global revenue" means revenue everywhere, as opposed to revenue in EU or revenue in Italy.
Every shop has global revenue - it is just your total revenue.
 
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#28
The "mom and pop" operations won't be affected as long as they aren't providing their service to the EU.

From the European Commission site:
When the regulation does not apply

Your company is service provider based outside the EU. It provides services to customers outside the EU. Its clients can use its services when they travel to other countries, including within the EU. Provided your company doesn't specifically target its services at individuals in the EU, it is not subject to the rules of the GDPR.
 
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#30
Long live Brexit. Stupid fucking EU paper pushers. /rant

So has anyone found a quick and simple way to become compliant for authority sites?

Adsense just popped a notification that links to 5 pages of GIBBERISH on how to become compliant. Surely there is a streamlined solution or how to guide that ticks all the boxes and keeps the EU deadbeat mafia happy for another day or two?
 
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#31
GDPR is a useful tool for when any EU politician wants to manipulate Fortune 500 otherwise move along, nothing to see
 
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#32
I do not know exactly what they are trying to manipulate with the GDPR.

What I do understand is that the Internet is a difficult thing for many governments.

Besides that every citizen can read honest information that they have no control over. There are foreign companies that make billions in advertising, which means that a lot of money is being withdrawn from countries.

But perhaps the worst is the information that these (large) companies possess. By making a free app they have almost as much information about citizens as a government while they also make money on it. While a government has to pay a lot of money for collecting this information.

In short: Money is Power - Information is Power - "Internet companies" are getting more and more, so there is also someone who gets less and less ...
 
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#33
My strategy so far:

Small popup "we use cookies..."​
Updated privacy policy​
Done.
Yep and yep. Next! Ha!

From the UK press and recent interviews. If your users are active, signed up theirselves, double opt in and you’re not harvesting private information without approval. Don’t change shit. If you’re a giant harvesting personal data, selling that data, you better be doing it right. You guys have been doing it right already tho :wink:

I’m to simple to even try to read alll the legalities.

The press and the EU will forget about it in a month and move on to some even more rediculous “job justifying” BS.