Do you prefer Thrive architect or Elementor and why?

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Hello everyone,

I am new to this forum and would like to start out by saying hello!

My question is: do any of you have any experience with Thrive architect and Elementor? Which do you prefer and why?

Does one have any speed or technical performance benefits over the other?

*I currently use Thrive, however, I am interested in the benefits (if any) of using Elementor.

Just want to hear your thoughts.

-P
 

BCN

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Elementor is OK, and it allows you to easily add new widgets that you can code yourself. But I really hate all page builders, if anything I'd use Gutenberg.
 

Ryuzaki

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Any page builder plugin / framework is going to destroy your page speed. They load tons of CSS and JS files that are all render-blocking, meaning they have to load before anything else on the page can appear.

Gutenberg is far less guilty of this but still semi-guilty. It loads an extra CSS file that's not huge but helps create styling for the overcomplicated blocks like Tables, 3 and 4 column areas, image galleries, and all the other ones that you look at that scream "bloat."

My advice is to use Gutenberg, keep your page designs simple (text, lists, images, maybe some buttons), kill off that extra CSS file (there are functions for this), and if you must have specialty blocks, create them yourself and merge their efficient CSS into your main CSS file. This only works if you have a custom theme or have a child theme set up, and not worth your time if you're not speed optimized otherwise.

As far as which one, Elementor or Thrive, is faster, I don't know. Whichever one is faster, it'll be a negligible difference and you'll still be in the "slow as hell" zone. Both are pretty pathetic in the speed arena.

If I was going to use one or the other, I'd be concerned more with which one provides the faster and better building experience and has the blocks I want to use.
 
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Any page builder plugin / framework is going to destroy your page speed. They load tons of CSS and JS files that are all render-blocking, meaning they have to load before anything else on the page can appear.

Gutenberg is far less guilty of this but still semi-guilty. It loads an extra CSS file that's not huge but helps create styling for the overcomplicated blocks like Tables, 3 and 4 column areas, image galleries, and all the other ones that you look at that scream "bloat."

My advice is to use Gutenberg, keep your page designs simple (text, lists, images, maybe some buttons), kill off that extra CSS file (there are functions for this), and if you must have specialty blocks, create them yourself and merge their efficient CSS into your main CSS file. This only works if you have a custom theme or have a child theme set up, and not worth your time if you're not speed optimized otherwise.

As far as which one, Elementor or Thrive, is faster, I don't know. Whichever one is faster, it'll be a negligible difference and you'll still be in the "slow as hell" zone. Both are pretty pathetic in the speed arena.

If I was going to use one or the other, I'd be concerned more with which one provides the faster and better building experience and has the blocks I want to use.
Thanks so much for your reply. There are a few reasons why I prefer to use third party page builders.

I am not that great in coding so the drag and drop features of these page builders is great for me, especially because of the live preview features they have.

I also prefer to use thrive because for me, it is easy to change the layout of a page and from what I’ve read, Gutenberg is not as flexible when it comes to this but maybe I am wrong.

I will continue to read up on all of this and thank you for answering my question (I know it’s fairly basic I just figured I would ask)

-P
 

JasonSc

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I'm in the same boat as you, my coding skills are limited. At my day job we use Avada and that thing has more bloat then a women pregnant with twins.

On my side projects I use Elementor. Using the correct caching you can get some faster speeds. However, like @Ryuzaki mentioned any page builder is going to add a LOT of bloat and will never be as fast as a stripped down theme.

I'm testing pegasaas.com right now. Its a caching/cdn SAAS which gives me a lot of control. Most specifically, I can pick and choose which JS gets lazy loaded. Which is cool, but even better the lazy load can be set to "on action", so a lot of the bloat never gets loaded at all. This is super helpful with Avada, because it loads just about everything there is. Additionally, it creates critical CSS for each page.

The initial results have been very positive. Using Lighthouse speed testing tool, the Avada Theme went from the average 50% mobile to average 70% mobile. The Elementor went from average 70% to 85%.

The down fall, its a SAAS, so one more monthly bill. I look at as the cost of doing business, and my time is better spent elsewhere (links, content)

I know some people will cringe at 70%-85% for page speed, but for the most part I'm 2x-3x faster then my competitors.
 
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Any page builder plugin / framework is going to destroy your page speed. They load tons of CSS and JS files that are all render-blocking, meaning they have to load before anything else on the page can appear.

Gutenberg is far less guilty of this but still semi-guilty. It loads an extra CSS file that's not huge but helps create styling for the overcomplicated blocks like Tables, 3 and 4 column areas, image galleries, and all the other ones that you look at that scream "bloat."

My advice is to use Gutenberg, keep your page designs simple (text, lists, images, maybe some buttons), kill off that extra CSS file (there are functions for this), and if you must have specialty blocks, create them yourself and merge their efficient CSS into your main CSS file. This only works if you have a custom theme or have a child theme set up, and not worth your time if you're not speed optimized otherwise.

As far as which one, Elementor or Thrive, is faster, I don't know. Whichever one is faster, it'll be a negligible difference and you'll still be in the "slow as hell" zone. Both are pretty pathetic in the speed arena.

If I was going to use one or the other, I'd be concerned more with which one provides the faster and better building experience and has the blocks I want to use.
Don't you have to know how to code to do Gutenberg? If so, are there any solutions for people that don't code but still fast site speed?
 

Steve

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People get really carried away with this kind of optimization. Use a full page cache and a half decent host close to your audience (or a cdn if you have a diverse audience), and you will be fine.
If optimizing webpages is a hobby, sure go nuts, but for most people it's just procrastination.

I have built and maintain a few latency critical applications, so have plenty of experience with this type of tuning at a lower level, but for content websites? I use WordPress with elementor, because it's absolutely fast enough, can be used by writers and designers and marketers, not just developers, and has great productivity.

It's also easily extended, with comprehensive developer docs, so we can develope a bespoke price comparison widget or similar, and any member of the team can then drag and drop it into there page layout.
It also allows for flexibility - want to have a special layout for a blog post? Just go ahead and make it.
With a traditional template based approach, you are going to end up with a load of one off templates cluttering the UI, and it just gets worse with time.

If you are still not convinced, go run pagespeed insights on your competitors, and work towards beating their scores
 

bernard

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I use Elementor and I am very happy with it.

The real value of course is in your own custom templates. Like if you want to do "Also read", you just do 2 clicks and you have your own block in there. You can template entire parts, like your product reviews, your integration with custom post plugins etc and a lot of it is dynamic. It's very easy and useful imo, to create custom category templates for your most valuable categories.

It has issues. Too many containers and no ability to target the actual html object, only the container.

Overall, I feel like Elementor is a big time value add and I think it's also easier to sell, when that's the time, instead of various custom coding.
 
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Over the years I've tested them all. Here's the thing. Thrive is way slower than Elementor. After I have switched the load time got significantly better.

I had chacheing and everything enabled I have only changed the page builder and that's it. Also I had some kind of annoying bug or something with the footer. So yeah Elementor gets my vote. Occassionaly I've used Visual Composer as well.