PreDigital Nomad

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Hi there
Just a quick introduction. Was a ski and climbing bum for many years, travelling from place to place and season to season before settling down in the European country that is now home. After a fairly lengthy (for me) and stable period in travel, I finally chucked it all up in the air and taught myself to create web pages and graphics around the turn of the century.

So a bit of this and a bit of that since then, including web design, SEO, cross-border and -language marketing until these days when I'm running my own sites and dodging most attempts to get me working on other people's.

Also currently trying to get my head around social media audience building and marketing, which for an old fart like me is like learning a new language or three. And that's what brought me here, having noticed @CCarter 's thread over at Th3 Core and read the blog post they were talking about. Was active on WMW in the 'olden days' and more recently at the sadly now-defunct SEOBook forums under different usernames but time for a new one anyway.

Hope to contribute if I can and keep up with what's going on with online stuff.
Steve
 
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cross-border and -language marketing
Welcome Steve, this is a great place to learn and contribute.

I'm interested in your experience with the quoted. I plan on moving to my other "home country" and being doing exactly cross-country/cross-language marketing, though I'm not sure exactly what model or product to offer.
 
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I'm interested in your experience with the quoted. I plan on moving to my other "home country" and being doing exactly cross-country/cross-language marketing, though I'm not sure exactly what model or product to offer.
That was what initially tempted me to move from the travel industry into website and content creation - in those days the standard of English (my native tongue) was fairly appalling as a 'second language' on most websites in this country. So I started out offering web design including translation services (on annual contract following initial site build) and built up a word-of-mouth reputation. I transitioned fairly quickly into online marketing as well (since most site owners knew the traffic was on English-language Google) and I had the advantage of being able to use natural language search terms.

Eventually I got sick of site owners being reluctant to do any relatively simple work themselves (content creation, link-building) and thought I might as well use the skills I'd collected and rank my own sites.

Nowadays things are of course a little different. The standard of non-native English has probably risen from 30/100 to 66/100 and there are adequate (although not good) online translation services available (which still will not necessarily help with search terms or user intent).

If you are fluent in a non-native language you will always have that as a USP for your own services or projects. I was chatting to a friend's daughter the other day who is about to go off to university. She has grown up fluent in two languages and is going to study two other languages at uni. She wasn't sure what she planned on doing afterwards and I told her that if she was interested she should take any courses on online marketing just to give her a background and see if it might be a fit.

Someone who knows SEM and social media marketing AND who can speak four languages should be able to walk into a good job at a marketing agency who has got their head screwed on the right way.

Caveat to the above: too many people are too convinced of their own skills in another language (see earlier point about the poor standard of English on travel websites). Despite having been fluent in two foreign languages (to the point at which I would dream in them) I would never attempt to translate into those languages myself. Unless you have been brought up with two languages it is very unlikely that your skills will be anything more than adequate.
That also means that it might be a tougher sell for someone with those skills because a business owner might say "Oh we already have Mathilde or Stefan who can speak good English" when their command of the language is mediocre but better than the owners.


Still, there are always multiple ways to use those language skills yourself within the realms of content creation and online marketing.