Is SERP Shaker Dead?

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#1
Is Serp Shaker still an option? There was this wonderful plugin here https://serpshaker.com/ (back in 2016) It allowed you to mass produce pages with some level of spintax. While it wouldnt get you the large volume keywords, it could certainly help you with low competition keywords. I'm curious if this is still viable, as a method to target super duper long tail. Is it worth it? Is there any up to date options? This of course is not my main quiver, but rather another mini strategy for lead gen toolkit.
 
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#2
As a user and personal friends with the original developer, I can confirm that this plugin is dead in the water. More security holes and footprints than you can shake a stick at.

The new "owner" was originally taught (kind of) how to code, and he's been copying and pasting from StackOverflow ever since. The plugin is an absolute mess, and the SSCC isn't much better.

A lot of MPCs (mass page creators) don't work that well anymore, HOWEVER, the ones that do keep up with changing algos and have made an actual software system instead of a dinky $47 Warrior+ special that won't be properly supported in 3 months will survive.

One thought coming from a local lead gen background is that if you're going to make mass pages, have a unique, highly readable and highly spun intro paragraph and outro paragraph that's used. The reason being is that if the paragraphs are long enough and varied just enough, it won't trigger an algo penalty for duplicate content, and allow you to rank for much longer. That, combine with city/state/zip variances, and you should be fine.

If you are going after a major metro, your site structure could be city+niche.com, with subdivisions/metro areas (upper east side, financial district, diamond district, bowery, harlem, etc) as categories. Then, the posts with city/town + keyword, putting LSI's in the H's, and a MAX of 8-13 LSI's in the tags section. You can make main menu pages about the subdivisions/metro areas and pull some unique stuff from Wikipedia and a few other spots with a nofollow citation, and link directly to the category pages, treating those pages as pillar posts.

Also, injecting EXIF data into the images you use on each page and embed will work wonders, and a related posts plugin at the bottom. Keep your keyword density under 2% or you'll trigger a panda penalty on yourself. Put a decent optin plugin in place, personally using Thrive Leads to achieve this on my side. Structure the site with additional pages that are specific to GMB categories, and make it somewhat lengthy, but not a pillar post. Schema markup will also get your site showing up pretty well.

After all that, make a GMB for it, link everything up and verify. GMB should pop up pretty quick after that, or can be pushed with a bunch of citation links and a solid blast from Synup.

And that's how you get a mass page site to look like a local authority site, collect the inbound leads, and start selling them to the highest bidder with a little spit and polish on the back-end once it's done. In a small market, probably generate between $2.5-$7.5k with some cold calls to businesses that can use the leads.

TL;DR: Don't use mass page plugins, they don't work. Get a mass page software instead, put a decent spin on it with some SEO, and get paid 30-100x what you put into it monthly.
 

John P.

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#3
There is a new mass page builder made for local leagen called ADM THOR.
 

eliquid

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#4
Whats the injecting data into the image EXIF?

Is that basically editing the image in Photoshop with the data? Or is there some new fancy way to do it fast and automated now?
 
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#5
Whats the injecting data into the image EXIF?

Is that basically editing the image in Photoshop with the data? Or is there some new fancy way to do it fast and automated now?
Yes and no. You can likely do it in bridge, but it makes a ton of difference in niche markets, like local or Ecommerce. Geo specific data + geo specific page + location schema through JSON-LD will give you a ton of local authority & relevancy towards your objective.

Example:


This alone has been instrumental in getting more local relevancy for my lead gen sites. Same can be done with mp4s before being uploaded to YouTube, or even using the optimized images in a slideshow in YT's video creator.

There are tools to do it in bulk as well if you have a site that just needs geo-relevance, but it has other practical applications as well. You can also fit up to 20,000 characters in the comments field on a picture, if you can whip up a decent description as well for the image.
 

Ryuzaki

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#6
There are far better ways of creating massive sites on the fly than spinning. I'd recommend some stealthy ad-lib content over spinning. The reason I say this is you're going to be far better off with correct grammar and similar sentences with some data and a few adjectives ad-libbed in than trying to full blown spin entire sentences or paragraphs. There's going to come a time if it's not already here when massive grammar and syntax issues stops you from ranking.

It doesn't take much to "add value" and Google doesn't have problems with boilerplate content. It doesn't take much to make it less boilerplate with ad-libs either, especially when the bulk of the content is going to be listings of locations that are different. What you're really going for here is more on-page "food" for Google to use.

What I'm trying to say is there's a way to do this that's totally fine, and a way to do this that's spam (by the eyes of Google).

I do agree with @DKurtz.me about having a solid opening and closing paragraph. That's enough usually if the rest is locations or info pulled from a database (or spreadsheet, in the case that I'm talking).

Without re-finding all of the information, what I used to do was roll through the bulk creation of pages using a CSV spreadsheet. This spreadsheet would be loaded with the ad-lib content that would be injected into the real content and added to the actual page, but in custom fields.

Then I'd have another custom field populated by a Google Map that would show all of the locations based on GPS coordinates. I grabbed these by botting a website that would spit them out if you pasted in the address.

Then I'd take all of the locations for each city or state and create a drafted page out of them. One per page, but each would have their own custom field that would include a state or city. So then in the page template for this whole thing I'd run a loop on page drafts that would grab only the ones with the appropriate state or city custom field value.

At the end of the day, It'd look like this:
  • Intro paragraph with ad-lib data and adjectives
  • Map of the US to interlink pages + Table of states
  • Google Map of all locations
  • All locations listed in a nice custom CSS table
  • Outro paragraph with ad-lib data and adjectives.
In between all of that I'd use H2 and H3 headers to help dial in the on-page, as well as Adsense and Pay Per Call phone numbers (click to call on mobile).

It still works and can rank you fairly well for shorter long-tails if you want to take the time to juice them up. But if you aren't spamming them with links, it's soul sucking work that's not any fun. I quit doing it for that reason. Projects like this can work for people willing to churn and burn. It's not an easier way to make money these days, not like it was in the past. And I wasn't happy littering up the internet. This was me 10 years ago though when money was the only motive.
 
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#8
So what software do you recommend @DKurtz.me I'm always interested in what's working best currently.
@RomesFall, that really depends on how you'd like to accomplish it.

  • Are you looking at making static sites or editable ones?
  • Do you want to push hundreds of thousands of pages with correlations between, or just a few hundred?
  • Will you be using domains, or hosting on Cloud/AWS/Azure/Alibaba/Pcloud instances to save domain costs?
  • Will you want to integrate other services to fully flesh out the sites, or are you happy with barebones marketing to just get the traffic from cold > warm > hot > conversion?
  • Will you be setting up redirects on a per page basis to another site, using them as organic siphons, or will they be the actual money sites?
  • Do you plan on flipping for profit, or growing and making long-term stacks on lead gen?
  • Are you targeting a market that requires finesse and high quality shit like legal, or are you hitting up plumbers for $15 a call and trying to do a hundred calls a week?

With a bit more detail from you, I'd be more than happy to help you pick one that suits your exact needs. Feel free to PM me, I'm all ears on how you're trying to set up shop for yourself and your business goals.
 
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#9
There are far better ways of creating massive sites on the fly than spinning. I'd recommend some stealthy ad-lib content over spinning. The reason I say this is you're going to be far better off with correct grammar and similar sentences with some data and a few adjectives ad-libbed in than trying to full blown spin entire sentences or paragraphs. There's going to come a time if it's not already here when massive grammar and syntax issues stops you from ranking.

It doesn't take much to "add value" and Google doesn't have problems with boilerplate content. It doesn't take much to make it less boilerplate with ad-libs either, especially when the bulk of the content is going to be listings of locations that are different. What you're really going for here is more on-page "food" for Google to use.

What I'm trying to say is there's a way to do this that's totally fine, and a way to do this that's spam (by the eyes of Google).

I do agree with @DKurtz.me about having a solid opening and closing paragraph. That's enough usually if the rest is locations or info pulled from a database (or spreadsheet, in the case that I'm talking).

Without re-finding all of the information, what I used to do was roll through the bulk creation of pages using a CSV spreadsheet. This spreadsheet would be loaded with the ad-lib content that would be injected into the real content and added to the actual page, but in custom fields.

Then I'd have another custom field populated by a Google Map that would show all of the locations based on GPS coordinates. I grabbed these by botting a website that would spit them out if you pasted in the address.

Then I'd take all of the locations for each city or state and create a drafted page out of them. One per page, but each would have their own custom field that would include a state or city. So then in the page template for this whole thing I'd run a loop on page drafts that would grab only the ones with the appropriate state or city custom field value.

At the end of the day, It'd look like this:
  • Intro paragraph with ad-lib data and adjectives
  • Map of the US to interlink pages + Table of states
  • Google Map of all locations
  • All locations listed in a nice custom CSS table
  • Outro paragraph with ad-lib data and adjectives.
In between all of that I'd use H2 and H3 headers to help dial in the on-page, as well as Adsense and Pay Per Call phone numbers (click to call on mobile).

It still works and can rank you fairly well for shorter long-tails if you want to take the time to juice them up. But if you aren't spamming them with links, it's soul sucking work that's not any fun. I quit doing it for that reason. Projects like this can work for people willing to churn and burn. It's not an easier way to make money these days, not like it was in the past. And I wasn't happy littering up the internet. This was me 10 years ago though when money was the only motive.

What do you mean with adlib and adjectives (I know what an adjective is, but in this context, why adjectives?)?
 

Ryuzaki

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#10
What do you mean with adlib and adjectives (I know what an adjective is, but in this context, why adjectives?)?
What I mean is that instead of spinning content at the word or sentence level, which never works out good, is that you can create a boilerplate template like...

The state of %STATE% has %NUMBER% facilities across %COUNTY% %ADJECTIVE% counties.

That's a short example. You can populate a CSV file with all of this data and have it automatically populate custom fields associated with the page created by the upload. The upload would create 50 pages (if you were targeting US states), which each state on a row and each %TAG% in the columns. You then would create a page or post template that uses all of the custom fields in strategic places as well as the other items I listed above.

The main point is that having a boilerplate template for content is better than spinning because you'll ensure it makes grammatical sense. Google doesn't need as much variation as people act like. I mean... they index tons of syndicated content with no changes at all. And the ad-libs (the act of inserting words or data into the content) adds real value.

You don't have to do adjectives but it is a way to get it a bit further away from being a completely transparent boilerplate template. If you take the time to do it well, it won't be noticeable at all. You could make %STATE% encapsulate a whole phrase, where you could rotate between "The state of Ohio" and "Ohio state," as another basic example.

So yes, it's kind of like spinning if you go too far, but what happens is it puts the control back in your hands and adds data into the mix, which you would otherwise have to hand insert after spinning.