Hi! Ready for 2019 & Need Your Input

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#1
Hey Builder Society!

Been lurking in the shadows here and there for a month or so. Figured I would finally contribute!

I’m excited for 2019. I’m hopeful that this year will be a good tipping point for my site.

A little background on me and my site:

Live in Austin TX and work in the tech world. Started up my affiliate site in January of 2017 out of curiosity and then turned into passion once I saw the opportunity it brought.

Came out of the gate strong in 2017 writing my own content, and then once the site started earning some money I started outsourcing. Did that for a good bit and then let it sit. I’ve done a little link building here and there, and also outsourced some of that too.

Sadly, my earnings are not as much as I would like and hoping some of my page 2-7 rankers kick up to page 1 this next year. I also need to add additional content, but it’s more of a “purchase more content every 6 months” type of process for now.

Here are some site stats from January 2017 until now.
  • Site hits: 56,000~
  • Total Earnings: $4,300
  • Highest 1 month earnings: $615
One of my biggest concerns with my site is the constant curiosity it brings around when some of my keywords will hit page 1. I have felt like my keywords are doing a complete dance on me, and often dive bomb for awhile after adding links, too.

Overall I feel like the site is heading in a good direction but it’s hard to keep adding links and or content (especially when outsourcing because it’s a decent sized investment) when I haven’t seen the needle move too much. Keep in mind it’s now been 2 years.

My first ask to all newbies and veterans is have you had a site that earned minimal income over 2 years and then tip the scales after that mark?

I’ve been told to stay the course by a marketer I trust and has had incredible success with affiliate sites, and have also seen the common theme of “just have patience” on sites I follow , but I get the creeping doubt at times that I should pick a different niche / cut my losses.

My other ask is for those who have had sites that they would consider a good learning failure. How long did you wait before you knew the site was a dud?

I’m betting answers here will vary wildly but really any thoughts or advice here would be great.

Thanks!

Luke
 

Ryuzaki

女性以上のお金
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#2
@Luke Neely, I'm glad you've started posting.

I have felt like my keywords are doing a complete dance on me, and often dive bomb for awhile after adding links, too
Yeah, this is normal, though it does seem to have gotten a lot worse lately. Google has a Rank Transition thing they do where if you get links you may see a positive, neutral, or negative effect. Neutral and negative effects may last for 30-90 days or something like that before you get the intended positive effect. This is to randomize things so link spammers can't really tell what's driving results.

But lately it does seem like a guaranteed negative in my experience, and one that seems to last quite a while longer than it used to. And at the same time I'm publishing content with no links that's zipping straight to the front too. Makes getting links a painful process.

My first ask to all newbies and veterans is have you had a site that earned minimal income over 2 years and then tip the scales after that mark?
For the most part, that's the expectation. I don't expect to earn much in the first year as a non-PBN users, non-spammer.

I had to dig through old posts because I lost some data recently when Google did their GDPR crap for Analytics. Here's a snippet of how organic traffic grew on my main project, though it doesn't show the whole picture in the left or right directions:



The site started on January 1st, 2015. So you can see how long it took to ramp up... 2 years until January 2017 before it was looking respectable. It simply takes time and Google fights spam with this kind of time-based throttling.

What more can you tell us about your site, like how many pieces of content you have up total, what the average word count is, how many referring domains do you have pointing at your site link-wise, etc.?
 
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#3
Hey Luke and welcome on board,

I make around 2k a month now after 1 year of serious work. I'm only able to work a few hours a day due to some chronic issues. I was in your spot just a half year ago. I'm not sure why you haven't moved forward in your earnings.

You didn't really share the most important things. How many articles have you written, what kind of keyword research do you do, what's the quality of your content (honestly), do you have anything to set yourself apart.

I suspect the content you're outsourcing is not good enough. Do you do keyword research on these outsourced topics? Do you look at Google Search Console to find keyword opportunities there? Do you write detailed instructions for your outsourced content.

In any case, the Digital Strategy Crash Course here will get you going if you apply yourself to it with some extra vigor, maybe skip the outsourcing until you can consistently write earning content.
 
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#4
@Luke Neely, I'm glad you've started posting.



Yeah, this is normal, though it does seem to have gotten a lot worse lately. Google has a Rank Transition thing they do where if you get links you may see a positive, neutral, or negative effect. Neutral and negative effects may last for 30-90 days or something like that before you get the intended positive effect. This is to randomize things so link spammers can't really tell what's driving results.

But lately it does seem like a guaranteed negative in my experience, and one that seems to last quite a while longer than it used to. And at the same time I'm publishing content with no links that's zipping straight to the front too. Makes getting links a painful process.



For the most part, that's the expectation. I don't expect to earn much in the first year as a non-PBN users, non-spammer.

I had to dig through old posts because I lost some data recently when Google did their GDPR crap for Analytics. Here's a snippet of how organic traffic grew on my main project, though it doesn't show the whole picture in the left or right directions:



The site started on January 1st, 2015. So you can see how long it took to ramp up... 2 years until January 2017 before it was looking respectable. It simply takes time and Google fights spam with this kind of time-based throttling.

What more can you tell us about your site, like how many pieces of content you have up total, what the average word count is, how many referring domains do you have pointing at your site link-wise, etc.?
Hi Ryuzaki - thanks for replying and for the insight / thorough answer. Really appreciate it.

My site has roughly 43 posts and all are around 2500-3000 words of great content. Not just comprehensive but also engaging and visual. I spent a lot of work on the posts and the outsourced content is great.

I think I have about 70 referring domains last time I checked linkminer. I don’t think that number is entirely accurate though.

How many domains did you have pointing at your main project before it kicked up in year 2?

Hey Luke and welcome on board,

I make around 2k a month now after 1 year of serious work. I'm only able to work a few hours a day due to some chronic issues. I was in your spot just a half year ago. I'm not sure why you haven't moved forward in your earnings.

You didn't really share the most important things. How many articles have you written, what kind of keyword research do you do, what's the quality of your content (honestly), do you have anything to set yourself apart.

I suspect the content you're outsourcing is not good enough. Do you do keyword research on these outsourced topics? Do you look at Google Search Console to find keyword opportunities there? Do you write detailed instructions for your outsourced content.

In any case, the Digital Strategy Crash Course here will get you going if you apply yourself to it with some extra vigor, maybe skip the outsourcing until you can consistently write earning content.
Hey Bernard -
Thanks for chiming in!

I don’t think that the content quality is the issue. I’ll check out the crash course again to see if I missed anything. I know I didn’t look at it as intently as it probably deserves to be when I first signed up.

Site has around 43 posts. Outsourced content as well as my own are all great posts. Well researched on keywords.

Something I did think of when reading your reply was my silo structure. It’s all setup and well organized but I think I may need to go deeper into each category?

When I first started the site I remember setting up all categories because I wanted to cast a wide net but didn’t come across how people were having success from going deep in one area and then rinse and repeat in another category until like...early 2018 I think.

Maybe that could be it? Not enough authority in any one area and google is like “what’s this gobbledygook?”
 

turbin3

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#5
Something I did think of when reading your reply was my silo structure. It’s all setup and well organized but I think I may need to go deeper into each category?

Maybe that could be it? Not enough authority in any one area and google is like “what’s this gobbledygook?”
Possibly. I've had it happen on multiple sites. Often with categories only having 3-10 posts each. There's no hard number, but demonstrating depth is a benefit, at least to a degree.

Sometimes, you can take it too far and have say hundreds of posts in 1 category. In cases like that, the solution is often sub-categories to build more coherent subjects. It's nice for the user too.

The question to ask yourself is how many posts do you think make sense for a category or sub-category?

In my mind at least, I feel like maybe a couple dozen is fairly good to flesh out a particular category (not including parent or sub-categories). Much beyond that, and for me at least, it just feels like I'm not being specific enough in my categorization.


For example, no user wants to look at a wall of 99 posts or dozens of paginated pages on "Dog Costumes". Maybe, instead, if I see a sub-category like "Large Dog Costumes" I'll have better UX when trying to find a ridiculous one for a Saint Bernard. :D

Those are arbitrary numbers, so don't quote me on it! ;-) It'll depend on your niche and keyword coverage.

On the other side, I'll expand on what Ryuzaki mentioned about Google's ranking transitions. It's designed to drive you INSANE. Best response I've found so far is:
  • Keep cost overhead to a minimum (wait out the storm and bleed the competition dry)
  • Do the things you know to be right
  • Move confidently forward and don't look back
It'll take some time to develop confidence in knowing that what you think is right, is actually the right strategy. The main takeaway here is, the evil "G" is intentionally trying to sow the seeds of doubt. Don't let them!