Exit popups and "corner popup" - how to best implement

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Ok, so I want to achieve two things:

1) Get more clicks to "on sale" pages for vendors

2) Get more signups for email list

I was thinking I'd achieve this by using exit popups for 1), a tactic recommended by Authority Hackers, and using a slide in corner popup for 2).

For 1) I am thinking of using a big exit popup saying something like "Didn't find what you were looking for? <newline> Check out these offers from Vendor <newline> Save up top 50%".

I'll have this one run on each unique landing page with a unique offer Blue Widget lander to Blue Widget vendor etc. It will only run on landing pages.

For 2) I am thinking of using a slide in popup (small size), saying something like "Want to know when widgets are on sale? <newline> Save 20% right now on popular vendor".

I'll have this one run on all pages? Or would it be better to leave it to non-landing pages? Two popups a page might be too much?
 

CCarter

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Question - what type of visitors are you expecting and are they coming from organic? The reason I ask is if you want people to come back to your website having a ton of these "pop-ups", "on-exit pop-up" and other stuff seems detrimental to your long-term success. I don't know how many blogs I've tried to read without 2-4 pop-ups screwing up my experience - but it's got pretty bad to the point I made it a single core value of my sites like SERPWoo to not have any pop ups or crazy experience problem that I would find annoying. Long-term it will benefit our brand, short-term perhaps less "forced" signups and people on newsletters that aren't really that interested.

On top Google has started blocking annoying Ads and experience within Chrome and Firefox has taken moves to do the same. So whatever you intend on implementing make sure to check within Chrome and Firefox that they work.

But overall - navigate your own website as a user and think about their own experience. Are they more or less likely to come back after it - but this depends on whether you even care of you want them to come back, some site owners just care about the eyeballs and not necessarily creating an audience for that brand around it.

So what's your goal for your website and the audience? What's the idea goal for your visitors? Clicking an Ad or signing up for a newsletter so they can come back?
 
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@CCarter Appreciate the insight. You touch on something here, which is that this site is very organic driven. I do get shares on social media and positive remarks, but this is definitely "buy once, never go back". A lot of that is due to the niche. It's expensive products, that you buy only a couple times in your life. There are spinoffs into the broader niche, but I don't see how it will easily sell me more items. I also know, the vendors told me, that their "on sale" pages convert better than anything else, so it's important to just get them on their page. I have an EPC of $4.

I do get what you're talking about, my first site documented on here, which only has made a couple hundred, actually rakes in emails with a simple popup. It converts far better than the Facebook page. That's a site in a topic with ongoing new stuff.

I don't know if this answered what you wrote. I think the exit intent popup is a YES, but the "general popup" is more likely to be a no. From a visitor perspective, then yes, I'd probably appreciate to know that there are products on sale if those I already saw didn't catch my fancy. "let me just have a look"
 

CCarter

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"buy once, never go back"
If that's the scenario then yeah I'd go all in. Sometimes though there are complimentary products/services or help resources that can lead to something better. But for example of you are selling a "plunger" - it's safe to say no one is coming back after buying something like that.