All hail BuSo

NSG

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Not quite 6 months ago I registered my first domain name.

"Make a blog," they said, "it'll be easy," they said.

Lies all lies.

Who is "they" anyway? Oh yeah, all those "easy solution sites." The, "sign-up for my expensive course and fancy new widget that will make you rich overnight" sites. And yes, I almost fell for it. I was half-way down the path of signing up with Bluehost after the allure of a "free domain" and an easy breezy sign up that was shoved down my throat on every website in the top searches. This followed by the plea of downloading easy plug-in after plug-in until my site would be slower than a turtle crawling through cement. Some Spidey sense told me not to do it. (Spoiler: I just checked a couple of my page load times on google pagespeed insights and got back a 95 mobile, 99 desktop. Hell ya.)

So I took a step back and dug a little deeper. In the midst of all the bullshit articles and "expert advice," I would find nuggets of wisdom buried in the rubble. Site speed matters. Having a plan before you start matters. Easy common sense stuff that I spent time on, but not near enough. Ultimately, I knew from previous failures in life, if I don't get started, I'll spin in analysis paralysis forever and never get started. So I jumped in head-first.

For a person whose only computer skills include a poor grasp of most Microsoft office products, internet searches and one class in C++ taken decades ago, I'd like to think I didn't do too bad. I ended up with a semi-respectable (albeit bare-bones) site customized with enough CSS and simple snippets of code in Ubuntu to get by. I'm proud of what I've accomplished even while holding down a 9-5 job (more like 7:30-6pm most days), and I still built something I'm not embarrassed to show my friends.

Like many others I've read about and sites that have long since been forgotten, I wasn't getting results. I realized about 3 months in that for the very competitive niche I chose that I would never get traffic from Google, so I branched out. Within 30 days after that realization, I had been banned from Facebook and Quora for not using a "real name" and then later for blatant link dropping. Fail. Then I spent far too long looking for "easy" back-links without having to shell out really money and being afraid to send out my content to authority sites for fear of ridicule. Fail. Then I fucked up my SSL so badly my site wasn't working at all and in the process of trying to fix that, I screwed something else up and my site was down for days while I was learning how to fix it. Fail again.

I stopped creating new content or looking for places to advertise on social media. After all, the social channels laid the smack down hard and fast. I started listening to all the voices around me that I wasn't worthy and that I'm living a pipe-dream if I think I can really make money out there. I started thinking they were right. Demons are strong motherfuckers.

Somewhere in the midst of feeling sorry for myself and wondering if I really have what it takes to quit my "9 to 5", I decided to keep going.

Not long after, I stumbled upon BuSo.

Ideas I never dreamed of have been discussed on this forum. Those nuggets of wisdom I was spending hours to uncover in the wild, were now suddenly gleaming around me left and right, just waiting to be plucked.

So I'll take my DA 4 site, with it's 1.6K impressions and I won't give up. And every time the thought comes along, I'll go back and re-read day 14 for the millionth time.

Hot damn, I'm fully bought into everything you're selling @CCarter. When I'm worthy of it, I'll step up to plate and grab those dollar bills.

For now, it's back to the grind.
 

Ryuzaki

女性以上のお金
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Welcome aboard. You've definitely found the right place for SEO discussion and development, as well as other topics too.

Not giving up on a project is essential but you have to make sure it's the right project. And in this case that's going to boil down to niche selection. Sometimes going after huge verticals like bodybuilding can be great. They're extremely competitive but there's so many long-tail terms you can go after and endless marketing opportunities that you can carve out a space for yourself and expand from there.

Then there's huge verticals like finance or health that have all kinds of competition and road blocks that I wouldn't dive into, myself. On the other hand you can find yourself going extremely hard on a niche with a small ceiling like "toasters" as the classic example.

That may not be a bad thing for a newcomer. It's good to have a cap in terms of content production, marketing, hitting full potential, and then flipping the site so you can start the next armed with all of your new skills.

My point is, I'd take inventory and really consider if I've done the right niche selection.
 

NSG

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Thanks Ryuzaki.

I will give it some serious thought. The idea of taking on a "toasters" type site to continue building my skills and confidence before I come back to the original niche is enticing.

Until I find a way out of my current day job the time I can spend will be limited, but I'm determined to make it count. I have toyed with the idea of turning my day job career into my niche at night, but quite frankly, it's just as competitive as the one I actually chose and I've already spent 15 years of my life breathing it every day.

I'd prefer to spend my days learning something new which is why I chose something that I was passionate about and lucrative. I feel like you can't go wrong there, even if it takes longer. Maybe that's naive thinking.

So far, my journey into web-design has not only stimulated my mind in ways I had long since forgotten about (corporate jobs suck the soul out of you), it has also increased my efficiency and willingness to get out of my comfort zone in other aspects of my life.

A win/win on every level.