22 Year Old Law Student From a Third-World Country

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Hey,

I have been lurking on this forum for a while. I remember reading some intro threads where people were talking about leaving their careers for digital marketing and feeling so vindicated. I think I will fit in here.

A little about me. I am a 22-year-old law student from a third world country looking to get into the world of digital marketing. I have always been thrilled by the idea of an online business, although I knew I couldn't pursue it seriously until I got into a good college and pursued traditional education to its logical end. I have about 2 years left in law school and I don't plan on getting a job after and sell my soul to a corporate law firm.

My aim is to be able to support myself with my online business. Anyway, law firms in my country pay less than $1200 a month for a fresh law graduate. So I know if I get a job like that, it is always going to hold me back while I do something that is not really interesting or rewarding. I don't find law uninteresting, it just doesn't give me the sort of thrill I get when I make a sale or build out a site.

While it is only now that I am getting serious about digital marketing, I have some experience in content writing and know a little bit about blogging. I worked as a content writer for different blogs for over 8 years. Nothing too big or interesting, just enough for pocket money for school and college.

For the last 6 months, however, I have been reading, researching, and executing everything I can in relation to SEO. It culminated in me deciding to start my own tech blog at the beginning of May.

Over the last month or so, I have written some 20k words of content. The amount of learning that happens when you start doing instead of reading is crazy (I know people always say it but you don't always realize it until you do). I don't have a lot of (or any) capital to spend on links or content, so it's just me hustling as of now. I don't have any issues with that though because I love writing content and I am learning to love all the processes involved in building a long term site including link building (#HAROFORLIFE).

With all the talk of Sandbox, algorithm updates, and pageview requirements for the premium ad networks, I was not hoping to make any money with my fledgling site for a VERY long time. I was prepared for the worst because I have struggled with the idea of delayed gratification all my life.

However, I have already started making money with Amazon, with around a sale a day. I achieved this by approaching only keywords that are looking for answers to a problem that can be solved using some product. I have plugged in those products on those pages that have neatly converted. I have 50-60 users a day on my site which I think is decent for how new it is. I achieved this by consciously working against my instinct of filling out all sections of my site and instead, doubling down on things that worked while spending some time every day leaking traffic from Reddit.

I instantly felt the urge to start another site to pursue the same strategy but decided against it as I want to work on this site for at least a year to see how far I can scale this. I will only start the next site when I feel like this site has reached its saturation point OR if I find another niche that IS MUCH better.

I know most people have a problem with Amazon and their commission rate changes but those commission rates in $ are gold in my country. If I can make $2000 a month from my site, that is enough money to live in the nicest neighborhood with all the luxuries. So I am not complaining.

How do I plan on achieving that?

For starters, I will focus on Amazon with the angle I talked about earlier and scaling info content to meet Mediavine's requirement of 50k sessions. I want to sign up for Walmart and BestBuy affiliate program but I haven't heard very good things about them so I am still exploring my options.

I want to try Pinterest but my intuition says that it won't help my site much. Anyway, I don't want to spread myself out too thin by trying to do too many things.

I think that should get me to the target of $1000 a month from my site within a year? (Correct me if I am being too unrealistic). I don't plan on selling my site at all if it meets my income targets because I am a sucker for that passive income while I build my site network.

Once I have some money, I want to throw a youtube channel into the mix. I don't think I can start a youtube channel for my site because I don't even have access to the products I talk about because they don't sell here. Maybe a personal youtube channel? Maybe I am jumping the gun.

For now, that is all I have on my mind.

What is my mindset?

I am generally positive about my plan but I do get sad when pageviews don't grow or if I go without a sale for a day. I want more validation in the form of consistent income before I decide to go full time. I do feel lost sometimes, especially with keyword research, which I have come to realize is a giant rabbit hole.

Thankfully, I have two years in college. Two years during which I am ready to work very hard for the life of my dreams. I am excited to see where I would be in two years from now.

------
I also want to thank all of you for the amazing value you provide free of cost while less successful people are busy shoving courses in people's faces.
 

Cash Builder

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I think your target of $1000 per month is very realistic, especially as you are already generating sales. That’s validation that what you are doing is working, all you need to do is continue grinding out the content and more sales will follow.

Content alone won’t make you money, so it’s good that you’re traffic leaking from Reddit. Try and find another couple of platforms for leaking, there’s plenty of ideas on this forum.

I’d say it’s wise to focus on a single site at the moment, as long as there is enough money in your niche. You are still learning and will make mistakes, so you don’t want to have 5 sites and then have to fix the mistakes on all of them.

Focus on one site, get a strategy for creating content and marketing, and build it out until you are happy which the processes. Then you can scale and build more sites.

Two years should be plenty of time to make it full time, although at some point you’ll have to decide where your time must be spent. I got to the final year of my degree and the workload was huge, so I decided to drop out and focus on my business full time. It was a tough decision and everyone thought I was crazy, but it’s been the best decision I’ve ever made.

Good luck!
 

Ryuzaki

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I want more validation in the form of consistent income before I decide to go full time.
This is wise. If you graduate college and haven't hit a full time income, I think it'd be smart to go ahead and accept a law-related job. Some might say that it's better to take the leap and have the extra time to go hard on your site, and sometimes that can work. I was forced into a situation like that.

But what people don't mention is all of the other stressors that come with not having enough money while putting in tons of work and not getting immediate gratification in the form of pay. That will wear on you fast.

On the flip side, if you have a day job, you can buy that extra time by outsourcing. Then you'll be saving a ton of energy and fast-forwarding into the future. And in this way you can focus on being the entrepreneur and manager of the business instead of the employee.

I think that should get me to the target of $1000 a month from my site within a year? (Correct me if I am being too unrealistic).
It's not unrealistic for someone with experience. Also, there are definitely people that come right out of the gates and create winning sites. $1,000 a month isn't exactly a win in the USA, money wise, but it's proof of concept. Getting to the first $1,000 per month is a lot harder than getting it to $2,000. You might be the person that can knock it out of the park on first go. But be prepared for the other possibility, which is much more common.

The good news is that if you continue to learn lessons and apply them and accept the feedback from Google and your users, and keep iterating, you'll get to where every nearly project is a success of some sort.

I don't plan on selling my site at all if it meets my income targets because I am a sucker for that passive income while I build my site network.
Yeah... me too. But I've also been doing this for around 15 years and 10 years full time (I think, probably longer). Eventually, as an SEO, you'll realize how volatile the algorithms are and how devastating new search features can be, etc. The best move is always to liquidate your sites at their best possible performance under you and take that extra money (typically 3 years worth of current monthly profit).

Then you have a war chest to do things like pay off a car, buy a house, and fund the next project. Once you've secured your future in tangible assets we all have to have, then you could mess around with accumulating passive income. The risk/reward scale gets re-balanced over time. But taking the extra money and reducing your expenses while positioning yourself for more future wins is generally a great idea.
 
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Yeah... me too. But I've also been doing this for around 15 years and 10 years full time (I think, probably longer). Eventually, as an SEO, you'll realize how volatile the algorithms are and how devastating new search features can be, etc. The best move is always to liquidate your sites at their best possible performance under you and take that extra money (typically 3 years worth of current monthly profit).

Then you have a war chest to do things like pay off a car, buy a house, and fund the next project. Once you've secured your future in tangible assets we all have to have, then you could mess around with accumulating passive income. The risk/reward scale gets re-balanced over time. But taking the extra money and reducing your expenses while positioning yourself for more future wins is generally a great idea.
Thank you so much for posting this. This is something I've been trying to wrap my head around for long and this post just cleared everything for me.
 
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Yeah... me too. But I've also been doing this for around 15 years and 10 years full time (I think, probably longer). Eventually, as an SEO, you'll realize how volatile the algorithms are and how devastating new search features can be, etc. The best move is always to liquidate your sites at their best possible performance under you and take that extra money (typically 3 years worth of current monthly profit).

Then you have a war chest to do things like pay off a car, buy a house, and fund the next project. Once you've secured your future in tangible assets we all have to have, then you could mess around with accumulating passive income. The risk/reward scale gets re-balanced over time. But taking the extra money and reducing your expenses while positioning yourself for more future wins is generally a great idea.
Very well said. Its getting harder to keep SEO websites stable nowadays and it doesn't matter anymore what "hat" you wear.

SEOs are usually good at analyzing / predicting what algo updates are about but i think we're getting to the point where few people really understand what Google is doing.

If someone is willing to pay you 2 - 3 years worth of profit for today's algorithm , you should really consider it.
 

secretagentdad

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Try Pinterest and try it hard.

They’re currently watering their ad accounts especially for video kinda like facebook did when they were suckering us all into building pages.

It’s a subsidy from big tech investors.
Take it while it’s hot.
 
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This is wise. If you graduate college and haven't hit a full time income, I think it'd be smart to go ahead and accept a law-related job. Some might say that it's better to take the leap and have the extra time to go hard on your site, and sometimes that can work. I was forced into a situation like that.

But what people don't mention is all of the other stressors that come with not having enough money while putting in tons of work and not getting immediate gratification in the form of pay. That will wear on you fast.

On the flip side, if you have a day job, you can buy that extra time by outsourcing. Then you'll be saving a ton of energy and fast-forwarding into the future. And in this way you can focus on being the entrepreneur and manager of the business instead of the employee.
This is a great idea and an interesting way to look at things. However, I am still not going to consider it because I know I perform the best when my back is against the wall. The more and more I think about this as a backup, the less and less motivated I will be to pursue this seriously.

The idea of a day job makes me feel depressed. I founded my own startup at 19 to sell fish using the internet because I was obsessed with being an entrepreneur.

I know that the pressure is going to be intense once I graduate. This is especially true in my country where men who are not "settled" after college are viewed in very poor light. That is why I have given myself two years to learn the ropes and build my sites.

It's not unrealistic for someone with experience. Also, there are definitely people that come right out of the gates and create winning sites. $1,000 a month isn't exactly a win in the USA, money wise, but it's proof of concept. Getting to the first $1,000 per month is a lot harder than getting it to $2,000. You might be the person that can knock it out of the park on first go. But be prepared for the other possibility, which is much more common.

The good news is that if you continue to learn lessons and apply them and accept the feedback from Google and your users, and keep iterating, you'll get to where every nearly project is a success of some sort.
This is great advice. I am prepared for the worst. In fact, that is why I have set a very reasonable and realistic goal of making $1000 a month from my blog (I would have set it even lower but I think $1000 is a good amount that keeps me excited.

Be that as it may, I am constantly trying to cut the learning curve by asking questions ad nauseam every chance I can. Unfortunately, I don't have a lot of people to reach out to because no one here even knows or understands what I am doing. Hopefully, my skills as a lawyer will help me network and open some doors in the future.

Yeah... me too. But I've also been doing this for around 15 years and 10 years full time (I think, probably longer). Eventually, as an SEO, you'll realize how volatile the algorithms are and how devastating new search features can be, etc. The best move is always to liquidate your sites at their best possible performance under you and take that extra money (typically 3 years worth of current monthly profit).

Then you have a war chest to do things like pay off a car, buy a house, and fund the next project. Once you've secured your future intangible assets we all have to have, then you could mess around with accumulating passive income. The risk/reward scale gets re-balanced over time. But taking the extra money and reducing your expenses while positioning yourself for more future wins is generally a great idea.
Till now, I was planning to play by the rules in an attempt to dodge any impact from penalties or changes in the algorithm. I now realize that it might be a good idea to sell and get some cash that can then be used to build more sites while also securing my real life.

I have done my fair share of partying, wasting money and fucking around, the time has come for me to embrace some frugality to build my dreams. Every penny I get from my blog will be reinvested to scale. I don't care if I lose money either, I know it will all pay off in the long run.

I think your target of $1000 per month is very realistic, especially as you are already generating sales. That’s validation that what you are doing is working, all you need to do is continue grinding out the content and more sales will follow.

Content alone won’t make you money, so it’s good that you’re traffic leaking from Reddit. Try and find another couple of platforms for leaking, there’s plenty of ideas on this forum.

I’d say it’s wise to focus on a single site at the moment, as long as there is enough money in your niche. You are still learning and will make mistakes, so you don’t want to have 5 sites and then have to fix the mistakes on all of them.

Focus on one site, get a strategy for creating content and marketing, and build it out until you are happy which the processes. Then you can scale and build more sites.

Two years should be plenty of time to make it full time, although at some point you’ll have to decide where your time must be spent. I got to the final year of my degree and the workload was huge, so I decided to drop out and focus on my business full time. It was a tough decision and everyone thought I was crazy, but it’s been the best decision I’ve ever made.

Good luck!
Thank you for all those words. It makes me feel more confident with what I am doing and makes me want to work harder now that I know my site is not a dud.

I will be working on the same site to learn content production and marketing as you said.

Congratulations on your success. For a second I like to think that you were standing where I am standing today. Makes me feel inspired to work even harder.

Try Pinterest and try it hard.

They’re currently watering their ad accounts especially for video kinda like facebook did when they were suckering us all into building pages.

It’s a subsidy from big tech investors.
Take it while it’s hot.
I'm sorry if this is a dumb question, are you suggesting that I run ads on pinterest with videos promoting my blog or the money pages?

What I had in mind for Pinterest was designing 4-5 pins for every post and then adding them to several of my own boards regularly. Then to seem like a normal user, pin (repin?) other people's pins too.

I tried using Tailwind tribes but it didn't seem that useful to be honest although I heard some good things about it.
 

secretagentdad

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Suggesting you use pinterest unless it really doesn't work for your niche for some niche specific reason.

Been growing their easier than anywhere else because they actively try to help participants on their platform grow atm.

Especially so for short form video. Looks like they want to be a video platform.